Should Physicians Ask Patients about Guns?

April 11, 2014
Should Physicians Ask Patients about Guns?

By Jennifer Zhu

Peer Reviewed

After the elementary school shooting in Newtown, CT in December 2012 that left 20 children and 6 adults dead, the country reacted as it had following the July 2012 movie theatre shooting in Aurora, CO, and the public meeting shooting involving Representative Gabrielle Giffords on January 11, 2011 in Tucson, AZ. Some called for tighter firearm safety laws, while others stood by the adage that “Guns don’t kill people,” and that this was no time to politicize a tragedy. The…

Read more »

Type 1 Diabetes: Research for Pancreatic Replacement, Transplantation and Regeneration

April 10, 2014
Type 1 Diabetes: Research for Pancreatic Replacement, Transplantation and Regeneration

By Karin Katz, MD and Loren Wissner Greene, MD, MA

Peer Reviewed

In 1964, Dr. Arnold Kadish used real-time glucose monitoring to adjust insulin infusion in a patient with diabetes and introduced the concept of a closed-loop system of insulin delivery. A decade later, several research groups developed closed-loop systems that linked glucose monitors with insulin pumps and determined how much insulin to deliver based on calculations from a set of algorithms . These big, bulky machines depended on intravenous routes of glucose…

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

April 7, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Matthew Vorsanger, MD

Peer Reviewed

It seems that over the past week, New York has finally started to emerge from the deep-freeze of winter; and as we see the beginnings of spring, the lay press has begun to take interest in the eternal cycle of renewal. In particular, news has focused on the rapidly-expanding technology of 3D printing and the inroads it has been making into the science of organ growth . When combined with these versatile devices, harvested and cloned cells can be…

Read more »

From The Archives: They’re all the ‘roid rage: origins and mechanisms of corticosteroid therapy.

April 3, 2014
From The Archives: They’re all the ‘roid rage: origins and mechanisms of corticosteroid therapy.

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 23, 2011

By Santosh Vardhana, MD

A 36-year-old obese male with hypertension and hyperlipidemia presents to the ER with new knee pain, swelling, and erythema. Joint aspiration reveals negatively birefringent crystals. He is started on oral prednisone.

A 26-year-old woman with lupus presents to ER with edema, hematuria, and fevers. On exam she hypertensive, febrile to 100.4C, and has periorbital and lower extremity edema. Urine dipstick reveals 2+blood and protein. She is started on IV methylprednisolone.…

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

April 2, 2014
Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

By Jennifer Mulliken, MD

Peer reviewed

The Eiffel Tower, an historic symbol of industry and science in France, celebrates its 125th anniversary this week. On March 31st, 1889, the first visitors ascended by foot to the top of the tower – 1,710 steps – as the lifts had not yet been completed. In May of the same year, the Eiffel Tower made its official debut at the World’s Fair in Paris, marking the 100-year anniversary of the French Revolution. Originally standing at 984 feet, it…

Read more »

A Randomized Trial of Flattery

April 1, 2014
A Randomized Trial of Flattery

By Michael Tanner, MD

Background
A small body of low-quality evidence suggests that flattery will get you nowhere. We, rigorously applying the tools of evidence-based medicine, set out to test the opposite hypothesis: that when it comes to forming warm, healing relationships with patients, you catch more flies with honey than vinegar.

Objective
To determine the effect of compliments on patient self-esteem and satisfaction with their doctors in an inner-city hospital clinic.

Design
Randomized controlled trial of outpatients aged 21-98 at the Bellevue Adult…

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

March 25, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Nicole Van Groningen, MD

Peer reviewed

At 12:57 pm last Thursday, the sun passed the celestial equator, marking the Vernal Equinox. What has spring meant to New Yorkers so far? Mother nature offered an impressive 3-day stretch of near-50 degree weather. The Eastern Phoebe, a drab-colored songbird thought to herald the beginning of spring, has been spotted in the city. And in Bowling Green, urban shaman and eco-ceremonialist Donna Henes conducted her 39th consecutive ritual of standing eggs on their ends, an ancient practice…

Read more »

Orders Of Magnitude

March 21, 2014
Orders Of Magnitude

By Olivia Richardson, MD

On the order of angstroms,

infinitesimally small

nucleotides pair off

and cling tightly to one another,

inseparable,

hundreds of kilojoules

binding them.

 

Like teenagers they dance,

entangled.

With arms entwined

they spin around one another-

spinning and twirling,

waltzing in neat lines

to the beat of their fate.

 

With endless energy,

they waltz-

in infinite numbers,

in trillions of cells,

with flawless precision,

never a step off beat.

 

On the order of angstroms,

a single nucleotide,

in an…

Read more »