PCSK9 Inhibitors: Who Could Need More than a Statin?

October 5, 2016
PCSK9 Inhibitors: Who Could Need More than a Statin?

By Rhodes Hambrick

Peer Reviewed

The atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk associated with hyperlipidemia (HLD), readily apparent from the Framingham Heart Study1 of the mid-20th century, has been the target of innumerable attempted pharmacologic interventions ever since. One class of agents, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, became – and have remained2 – the gold standard for managing HLD-associated ASCVD risk in the setting of the remarkably favorable findings of multiple studies in the 1990s.3-5 While other agents, including niacin, fish oil, and fibrates, have …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 4, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Ian Henderson, MD

Peer Reviewed

This past week Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton took part in the first presidential debate of the 2016 elections. Held at Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, the debate was met with much anticipation and many questions. In between the sniffles, shimmies, microphone malfunctions, fact checking, and high volume interruptions the candidates discussed several pressing issues including the country’s economic future, race relations, and national security. While at first many were hesitant to declare a winner, a Washington Post-ABC …

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A Brief History of Early Medical Photography

September 30, 2016
A Brief History of Early Medical Photography

By Emily Milam, MD

Peer reviewed

The history of medical photography is rich and tracks the evolution of both technology and medicine. Photography’s application to medicine has become increasingly multifaceted with the advent of digital photography, smartphones, telemedicine, and the ease of photo sharing and storage. Its use has been of huge benefit since the more rudimentary days of oral communication, written description, moulage, and hand-drawn illustrations. Photography was among the first wave of medical documentation in which the subject’s condition could be more objectively …

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From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

September 29, 2016
From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 20, 2013

By Lauren Foster

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hypertension is a pervasive chronic disease affecting approximately 65 million adults in the United States, and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality . Antihypertensives are widely prescribed due to their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, the phenomenon of the “white coat effect” may be a complicating factor in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive patients. It is well established …

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Oxygen-Induced Hypercapnia in COPD: What is the Mechanism?

September 28, 2016
Oxygen-Induced Hypercapnia in COPD: What is the Mechanism?

By Jonathan Glatt

Peer Reviewed 

It was my first week on the wards as a third-year medical student, and I found myself huddled with the team in a busy corner of the Bellevue ED, listening to a man cough and wheeze his way through an interview. He was an elderly patient with an extensive smoking history–a lifetime of a destructive habit that had dilated and distorted his lungs beyond repair. He told us, between bouts of breathlessness, of worsening dyspnea and copious sputum production over …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

September 26, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Chio Yokose, M.D.

Peer Reviewed

This week, Keith L. Scott was shot to death by police in Charlotte, North Carolina while his wife recorded the scene. The footage was broadcast widely and re-ignited the intense discussion about race relations and law enforcement in America. While the police allege that he had a weapon and posed an imminent threat, his family members report that he was holding a book, not a gun, as he prepared to pick up a child from school. Along with many …

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Little Knowledge, Large Problem: Lack of Nutrition and Obesity Education in Medical Curricula

September 23, 2016
Little Knowledge, Large Problem: Lack of Nutrition and Obesity Education in Medical Curricula

By Elissa Driggin

Peer Reviewed

At almost every single one of my medical school interviews, each interviewer, noting my college major in nutritional science, asked some variation of the question, “What should I be eating to stay healthy?” Each time, I was left unsure of whether or not this question was aimed to gauge my ability to hold a conversation in a stressful environment, articulate my thoughts in a logical manner, or fulfill some other mysterious goal of the infamous medical school interview process. Or, …

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From The Archives: Reflections on Hurricane Sandy

September 22, 2016
From The Archives: Reflections on Hurricane Sandy

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated, January 11, 2013

By Jessica Taff, MD

As the 3 major teaching hospitals that make up NYU Medical Center begin to come back online, we thought it was the right time to share some of our reflections on Hurricane Sandy.  It’s been a long strange journey for the faculty, housestaff, students and most of all our patients.  It’s time now though for us to come back home; to return with a renewed sense of purpose and a …

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