Meeting Perspectives: 2007 American Thoracic Society International Conference

June 5, 2007
Meeting Perspectives: 2007 American Thoracic Society International Conference

Commentary by Doreen Addrizzo-Harris MD, Associate Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

The 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) meeting took place between May18-23 in San Francisco, California at the Moscone Conference center.  There were more than 400 sessions, 800 speakers and 5,500 original research abstracts.  The meeting is concentrated in the areas of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine.

The NYU Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care medicine, under the direction of Dr. William N. Rom, presented more than 30…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

June 4, 2007
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Much of the week in the media was spent discussing XDR TB. Andrew Speaker, a man on his way to his wedding in Santorini Greece (the picture of his wedding is to the right) managed to evade US security multiple times. The story is convoluted with many people telling different versions. It appears that he has smear negative, culture positive XDR-TB. His now father-in-law is a TB researcher, who insists that his new son-in-law did not catch it from his lab. Most importantly, when officials…

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Meeting Perspectives-Internal Medicine 2007-The American College of Physicians,Part 2 (continued)

June 1, 2007
Meeting Perspectives-Internal Medicine 2007-The American College of Physicians,Part 2 (continued)

Commentary by Mitchell Charap, MD Senior Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

I now return (See previous post) to my discussion of the STAR *D report (Am J Psychiatry. 2006;106) which is a very important study of antidepressant therapy conducted by NIMH. 4000 patients at 41 sites (18 general medical settings). There was no placebo control. Those patients who failed monotherapy with citalopram (up to 60 mg) were offered two options: switching to another therapy or…

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Recent Developments in the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

May 31, 2007
Recent Developments in the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

Commentary by Michael Seidman MD, Chief Oncology Fellow

New treatment options for both early and advanced Renal Cell Cancer have recently been published. Traditionally, treatment for early stage disease was partial or radical nephrectomy. In the metastatic setting, treatment options were limited to toxic cytokine therapy with IFN or IL-2.

Some recent literature has suggested that small, incidentally found renal tumors can safely be watched without the need for invasive surgery. Remzi et al retrospectively reviewed 287 tumor bearing kidneys 4cm or…

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New Guidelines on the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

May 30, 2007
New Guidelines on the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Commentary by Dr. Daniel Labovitz, Director of the NYU Stroke Center

After an 8-year hiatus, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has at last published a fresh set of guidelines on the management of acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) . ICH represents between 10 and 20% of all first strokes, depending on the population, but carries a mortality rate of 35% to 50%, with hemorrhage volume, hemorrhage location, intraventricular extension and age all contributing independently to the risk of death.…

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ShortCuts-This week in the Journals

May 29, 2007
ShortCuts-This week in the Journals

The big bomb this past week was the Rosiglitazone Effect. Resulting in front page news in various newspapers (on multiple days), the meta-analysis in last week’s NEJM is causing quite the stir. For more information, see the post.

What’s old is what’s new. An interesting editorial on Medpage reviewed the reason that HCTZ is the most commonly prescribed thiazide, and it’s not efficacy. HCTZ is 4 letters and takes a second to write on a pad, chlorthalidone is 14 letters and, while possibly the…

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How should you approach a pregnant patient with chronic kidney disease?

May 25, 2007
How should you approach a pregnant patient with chronic kidney disease?

A 31 year old female with hypertension and proteinuria secondary to IgA nephropathy, currently treated with an ARB, presents to clinic stating that she would like to become pregnant.

What is the risk of fetal morbidity in the setting of ARBs/ACE-inhibitors? What antihypertensive medications are used during pregnancy? At what point would you switch a patient’s medications if she is trying to become pregnant? What is the natural course of IgA nephropathy during pregnancy?

-Minisha Sood MD, PGY-3

Pregnancy and Chronic Kidney

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FDA Black Box Warning on Gadolinium

May 24, 2007

Back in December we reported on the FDA cautioning practioners about the use of gadolinium (an mri contrast agent) in patients with chronic kidney disease.  The FDA is now requesting a black box warning  stating “that patients with severe kidney insufficiency who receive gadolinium-based agents are at risk for developing a debilitating, and a potentially fatal disease known as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). In addition, it would state that patients just before or just after liver transplantation, or those with chronic liver disease, are also at risk…

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