Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

November 1, 2016
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By:  Aditya Sreenivasan, MD

For the Halloween edition of Primecuts, we resisted the temptation to follow the standard media trend and go exclusively with “spooky” or alarming articles. Though the subject of the dreaded Zika virus does come up below, we thought we’d start with some good news regarding improving outcomes for out-of-hospital arrest.

Increasing Access to AEDs and Improved Outcome for Out-of-Hospital Arrest 

The bad news is that survival rates for out of hospital arrest remain low – approximately 10% in industrialized countries. The …

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Mystery Quiz

October 28, 2016
Mystery Quiz

Vivian Hayashi MD, Robert Smith MD

The patient is an 86 year old man who presented with weakness, lethargy and falls.  His history was noteworthy for an episode of empyema nine years earlier that was managed with tube thoracostomy followed by decortication.  Seven years prior to this admission, upper endoscopy revealed Barrett’s esophagus and adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus.  An esophagectomy and gastric pull-up was performed.  The patient had intermittent episodes of aspiration over the subsequent years.  Prior to the current admission, the patient complained …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 25, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Danielle Brewington MD, MS

Peer Reviewed 

As October draws to a close, the presidential debates have wrapped up and most people are bracing until the end of the political season. Many of the revelations in politics this week have left the entire nation depressed, so first up for discussion this week is an article about how to predict if anti-depressants will work in patients presenting with MDD.

fMRI and History Predict Anti-Depressant Effectiveness1

Researchers have shown that the amygdala plays an important role in …

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The Rising Tide of Food Allergy

October 20, 2016
The Rising Tide of Food Allergy

By Kristina Cieslak, MD

Peer Reviewed

Food allergies affect approximately 8% of children and 5% of adults, with a steadily increasing prevalence .  Risk factors for the development of food allergy are numerous and include genetics, sex, and ethnicity . Indeed, children with a parent or sibling with peanut allergy are seven times more likely to develop a peanut allergy of their own, and peanut allergy demonstrates a 64% concordance rate among monozygotic twins as compared to 7% among dizygotic twins . The …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 17, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Jenna Conway, MD

Peer Reviewed 

With less than a month to Election Day, we learned this week what Donald Trump deems appropriate “locker room talk” about women, while several women came forward to accuse him of inappropriately touching them. Hillary Clinton continues to deal with email leaks, including thousands published on WikiLeaks that were hacked from her campaign manager’s inbox. Other notable events range from the death of the King of Thailand to Bob Dylan becoming the first songwriter to ever win the Nobel …

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From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

October 13, 2016
From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 4, 2013

By Michael Crist

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Until recently, little thought was given to the important role played by the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum in glucose homeostasis. The involvement of the gut in glucose regulation is mediated by the enteroinsular axis, which refers to the neural and hormonal signaling pathways that connect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with pancreatic beta cells. These pathways are largely responsible for the increase in insulin that occurs during the postprandial …

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Why It Isn’t So Cool To Go Gluten-Free

October 12, 2016
Why It Isn’t So Cool To Go Gluten-Free

Chloe Cipora Goldman, MD

Peer Reviewed

During a recent encounter with a 32 year-old female presenting for surgical clearance for knee surgery, the patient touted that she was in superb health, exercised daily, and even followed a “healthy” gluten-free diet, despite not having celiac disease. This patient is one of the millions of Americans that have jumped on the gluten-free bandwagon, which has been made popular with the help of athlete and celebrity endorsements. The idea that gluten is something that should be avoided has …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 10, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Samir Bhalla, MD

Peer Reviewed

October is upon us, which typically is notable for cooler weather, pumpkin spice lattes and playoff baseball. The focus this year, however, is the upcoming presidential election. Last week, Governor Mike Pence and Senator Tim Kaine faced off in the Vice Presidential debate at Longwood University in Virginia. Kaine was on the offensive, frequently bringing up many of the highly contested ideals and proposals of Donald Trump, while Pence did his best to refute these points. Many polls including …

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