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The Pool

June 24, 2016
The Pool

By Jafar Al-Mondhiry, MD

I’m surprised I even noticed it. The patient gowns, IV poles, slipper-socks—all normal fare in the hallways of a busy hospital.  But down in the elevator bank, just between the Emergency Department and the main hospital floors above us where invariably such sights predominate, he seemed out of place. The stony, oblivious look he carried on his face made my brow furrow just a little deeper, seeing that checked-out expression so characteristic of the over- or under-medicated psychiatric patient.

And then …

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From The Archives – Medicine’s Favorite Default Diagnosis: Non-compliance

June 23, 2016
From The Archives – Medicine’s Favorite Default Diagnosis: Non-compliance

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated August 2, 2012

By Robert Keller

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In a small examination room on the Ambulatory Care floor of a large hospital in Brooklyn, I greet Ms. S, a 53-year-old Jamaican woman, as she walks through the door and plops herself down in the chair across from me. Having spent 20 minutes perusing her chart, I know that she suffers from morbid obesity, uncontrolled hypertension (blood pressure 165/95), and terrible diabetes (A1c 13.8%). I have already …

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The Brain’s Effect on the Heart After a Stroke

June 22, 2016
The Brain’s Effect on the Heart After a Stroke

By Rory Abrams, MD

Peer Reviewed 

The heart and brain are hopelessly intertwined. Their connection is greater than the tissues and sinews that physically tether them to the human body, and can be understood in three ways: 1) how the heart affects the brain, 2) how the brain affects the heart, and 3) how the heart and brain are both affected by various neuro-cardiac syndromes.  The heart’s effects on the brain are illustrated when there is hypoperfusion of the brain resulting in syncope, or when …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

June 20, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Janice Jang, MD

Peer Reviewed

On Sunday, June 12th a safe haven for the L.G.B.T. community in Orlando bore witness to the deadliest mass shooting in the United States and the worst act of terrorism in our country’s history since 9/11.   The 29-year-old gunman, Omar Mateen, entered the gay nightclub filled with hundreds of people celebrating the club’s weekly Latin Night, and single-handedly turned the scene into a deadly massacre, leaving 49 people dead and 53 wounded .  In the aftermath of the shooting, …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

June 14, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

Rina Mauricio, MD

Peer Reviewed 

The presidential primary season ended this week. Former senator Hillary Clinton secured enough delegates to win the Democratic nomination, though her opponent Bernie Sanders has not given up the fight. On the Republican side, Donald Trump is focused on the general election, with Ted Cruz and John Kasich long gone from the race.

This presidential election has already proven to be historic. Hillary Clinton is likely to be the democratic nominee, thus securing her place in history as the first …

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Gun Violence: A Public Health Concern?

June 9, 2016
Gun Violence: A Public Health Concern?

By Matthew B. McNeill, MD

Peer Reviewed

One can often feel numb or indifferent to the seemingly nightly reports of gun deaths on American news programs. Individual homicides, suicides, or accidental gun deaths are tragic and tragically commonplace. However, over the last two decades, a tide of unrest with the current role of guns in America has arisen in the wake of mass school shootings in places such as Jonesboro, AR (1998, 5 killed, 10 injured), Columbine, CO (1999, 13 killed, 24 injured), Red Lake …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

June 6, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Dana Zalkin, MD

Peer Reviewed

This week boxing champion and international legend Muhammad Ali passed away at the age of 74. Ali has been recognized as one the best, if not the best, heavyweight boxer the sport has ever seen .  But it wasn’t just his athletic prowess that distinguished him; Ali was known for his religious views, his strong political stances, and his very publicized battle with Parkinson’s disease.  Barack and Michelle Obama summed it up nicely when they remarked on “how fortunate …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

May 31, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Jung-Eun Ha, MD

Peer Reviewed

These past few weeks have seen some very interesting news items. The first genitourinary reconstructive (penile) transplant in the US was performed by surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital earlier this month. The patient lost his organ to penile cancer in 2012 and has thus far had an uneventful post-operative course, including the resumption of normal urination. This surgery follows two earlier penile transplants performed abroad. The first transplant was in China in 2005, but the transplant had to be …

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