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Tales of Survival: Do No Harm

January 12, 2018
Tales of Survival: Do No Harm

By Derek Moriyama, MD

He stared blankly at the ceiling. “Mr. K can you close your eyes?” my attending asked, speaking slowly and clearly, making sure that the patient could hear every word.

There was no response; his gaze remained unrelentingly fixed on the square panels above him, as if they were shooting stars through the night sky.
Trying once more, the senior doctor continued, “Can you squeeze my hand?”

Again, no response.

It was about one month into his hospital stay, half of that …

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From the Archives: The Complicated Story of Saturated Fat

January 11, 2018
From the Archives: The Complicated Story of Saturated Fat

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 8, 2013

By Gregory Katz, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Everyday in clinic, we tell our patients to choose foods low in saturated fat. Because these foods raise plasma cholesterol, the thinking goes, they cause heart disease. Today, every major medical organization – from the American Heart Association to the Harvard School of Public Health to the USDA  – recommends a diet low in saturated fat to prevent and treat heart disease. The fat-cholesterol-heart disease connection …

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

January 8, 2018
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By: Justin Feit, MD

We were welcomed to 2018 with the coldest New Year’s in New York City in over 50 years with a cool 10°F recorded in Times Square . The onslaught of frigid weather continued as the northeastern United Status battled the ‘Bomb Cyclone’ this week . We turn our minds to warmer thoughts as we take a look at this week’s medical news.

Safety of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Cardiac Devices

Patients who have pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are …

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Tales of Survival: Red Sox Rivalry

January 5, 2018
Tales of Survival: Red Sox Rivalry

By Kate Otto, MD

Peer Reviewed

Mr. Williams came to us as so many patients do.

“I just fell down,” he repeated, grumpily, his snaggletooth resting on his cracked, pursed lips.

Our team of eight white coats had descended upon him with rapid fire CIWA questions during morning rounds—the Emergency Department’s workup suggested his fall was secondary to intoxication—but he wasn’t giving up a single hit.

“Have you been feeling sweaty at all today?”

“That’s no one’s business but my own.”

“Do you have a …

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Core IM Podcast: Mind the Gap on Albumin in SBP

January 3, 2018

Let’s go deeper as to why we do what we do: albumin in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP)! Written by Dr. Steve Liu || Hosted by Dr. Steve Liu and Janine Knudsen || Graphic Design by Mr. Ramon Thompson (Twitter @newsaturdayds || @newsaturday)

Time Stamps:

  1. How much albumin is recommended in  SBP? (1:45)
  2. What antibiotics are used for treatment of SBP? (2:30)
  3. Why do we give albumin in SBP? (4:15)
    • How does albumin compare to crystalloid? (7:15)
    • Do we always have to give to albumin? (9:00)

Subscribe to CORE IM on any podcast app! Follow us on Facebook @Core IM || Twitter @COREIMpodcast || Instagram @core.im.podcast. Please give any feedback at COREIMpodcast@gmail.com.

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How Can You Best Address Polypharmacy in the Elderly?

December 21, 2017
How Can You Best Address Polypharmacy in the Elderly?

By Michael Nguyen

Peer Reviewed

Polypharmacy has been defined as the use of multiple unnecessary medications, the use of more medications than is clinically warranted or indicated, or the use of unnecessary, ineffective, or harmful prescribing. Problematic polypharmacy should be differentiated from appropriate polypharmacy. Consideration of overall appropriateness of therapy is more valuable than simply considering the number of medications that an older person is prescribed.

Overmedication and failure to perform prudent medication reconciliation is a growing problem in prescribing practice. In individuals over 65 …

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

December 18, 2017
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By: Amanda Dowden, MD

This week, Alabama elected its first Democratic senate leader in 25 years, as democrat Doug Jones beat Republican Roy Moore in Alabama’s Senate Race. In local NYC news, in the wake of the opioid epidemic the Bronx opens a state supported outreach center for people and families struggling with substance abuse. Despite all that is going on in the news, there’s plenty of exciting, new medical literature to discuss, so let’s dive right in.

Edoxaban for the Treatment of Cancer-Associated Venous

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Age Is Just a Number: Combating Muscle Loss in The Elderly

December 14, 2017
Age Is Just a Number: Combating Muscle Loss in The Elderly

By Carl Preiksaitis

Peer Reviewed

The term “sarcopenia” was introduced in 1989 to characterize the loss of muscle mass that occurs as a consequence of advancing age.1 Use of the term has since grown to include the loss of muscular function experienced in older adults. The prevalence of sarcopenia is estimated to be approximately 29% in community-dwelling older adults and 33% in individuals living in long-term care institutions. Sarcopenia is linked to increased morbidity and mortality from physical disability, increased falls and fractures, decreased quality …

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