Systems

Class Act: Soy and Breast Cancer – What’s the Connection?

November 26, 2008
Class Act: Soy and Breast Cancer – What’s the Connection?

Commentary by Alexis Melnick, NYU School of Medcine Class of 2009

Faculty peer reviewed

With the increasing popularity of soy foods in the American diet, there has been considerable debate over the link between soy and the risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the breast. The interest in this association stems from soy-containing isoflavones, soybean-derived compounds with chemical structures similar to estrogens that act as weak partial agonists at estrogen receptors. Initial data supported the chemopreventive potential of soy and were based on several findings: the…

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Analgesia for Cirrhotics: A Practical Approach

November 20, 2008
Analgesia for Cirrhotics:  A Practical Approach

Commentary by Albert B. Knapp MD, NYU Clinical Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology)

THE CASE:
WS, a 49 yo year old Caucasian male with a known 35 year history of alcohol abuse, now presents with jaundice, tense ascites and a left shoulder fracture following a bar room brawl last night. He is admitted to the orthopedic service for elective pinning but is presently in great pain. You are consulted in regards to pain management….

THE QUESTION:
How should you approach the use…

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Grand Rounds: “Advances in the Therapy of HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

November 19, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Advances in the Therapy of HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

Commentary by Jon-Emile Kenny MD, PGY- 2

 

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before last week’s grand rounds.

Medical grand rounds on November 12, 2008 was given by Dr. Jose Baselga, MD.  His lecture, ‘Advances in the Therapy of HER2 Positive Breast Cancer’ highlighted the biochemical aspects of HER receptors and the current and future pharmacological implications thereof.

Roughly one in four breast cancers are HER2 receptor positive.  Phenotypically, these cancers tend to present as locally advanced tumours at an…

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Breaking News: The Jupiter Trial

November 12, 2008
Breaking News: The Jupiter Trial

Commentary by Ilana Bragin MD, PGY-3

This week online in the NEJM, the results of a trial known as Jupiter were presented in an article that will likely change the way we approach cardiovascular health protection. The Jupiter trial attempts to answer this perturbing question: “Why do half of all myocardial infarctions and strokes occur in apparently healthy men and women with levels of LDL that are below currently recommended thresholds of treatment?” The study addresses the biomarker C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker that has long been…

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Mystery Quiz- The Answer

November 8, 2008
Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Posted by Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The answer to the mystery quiz is heart failure.  The CXR shows bibasilar opacities with hilar fullness on the right. The CT images are remarkable for bilateral effusions, with dependent opacities that increase in density along the anterior-posterior axis.  The lung appears clear in the anterior zone (Image 5, arrow; Coronal Image 1); ground glass opacification, characterized by parenchymal haziness which does not obscure the underlying pulmonary vessels, is evident in the mid lung (Image…

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Grand Rounds: “A New Mechanism of Platelet Thrombus Regulation Induced by ADAMTS-18: Clinical Implications”

November 6, 2008
Grand Rounds: “A New Mechanism of Platelet Thrombus Regulation Induced by ADAMTS-18: Clinical Implications”

Commentary by Yelena Kopyltsova MD, PGY-2

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before last week’s grand rounds.

Last week’s grand rounds speaker was Simon Karpatkin MD, NYU Professor of Medicine & Director of the NYU Division of Hematology. In the 80s, multiple cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura were observed in patients with AIDS.  It was noted that these patients had elevated anti-platelet IgG levels (extracted from immune complexes), which correlated strongly with low platelets.  Dr. Karpatkin and his colleagues became interested in elucidating the mechanism…

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Mystery Quiz

October 30, 2008
Mystery Quiz

Posted by Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The patient is a 61 year old man with a history of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and poorly controlled hypertension on five medications who was in his usual state of health until three days prior to admission when he noted increasing exertional dyspnea associated with chest pain, abdominal distention, bilateral lower extremity edema (left greater than right).

Exam notable for BP 105/54 (lower than all other prior measurements), HR 74, O2 Saturation 90%. PaO2…

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Grand Rounds: “Novel Applications of Erythropoietin in Cardiovascular Disease”

October 22, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Novel Applications of Erythropoietin in Cardiovascular Disease”

Commentary by Srikant Duggirala MD, PGY-2

Please also see the clinical vignette presented during this week’s grand rounds

 

On Wednesday, October, 15, 2008, the NYU Department of Medicine Grand Rounds featured one of its own guest speakers, Stuart Katz M.D., Professor of Medicine and Director of Heart Failure at NYU School of Medicine, with his lecture entitled “Novel Applications of Erythropoietin in Cardiovascular Disease.”

Dr. Katz began his lecture with a discussion of oxygen uptake in a various individuals such as elite…

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Grand Rounds: “Molecular Genetics of Colorectal Cancer”

October 19, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Molecular Genetics of Colorectal Cancer”

Commentary by Sabina Berezovskaya MD PGY-3

Please also see the clinical vignette presented during last week’s grand rounds

On Wednesday, October 8, 2004, the NYU Department of Medicine Grand Rounds featured guest lecturer Vincent Yang, M.D. Ph.D., Professor of Medicine and Director of  Division of Digestive Diseases at Emory University School Medicine with a presentation entitled  “Molecular Genetics of Colorectal Cancer”.

 

Dr. Yang first oriented the audience to the outline of the talk and began his presentation with a case…

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Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for the use of chondroitin sulfate in the treatment of osteoarthritis?

October 17, 2008
Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for the use of chondroitin sulfate in the treatment of osteoarthritis?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Jillian Borman, MS-4, Reviewed by Svetlana Krasnokutsky, MD, Clinical Instructor, NYU Department of Medicine

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of joint pain in the aging population. The pain of OA, which is generally worsened with joint use and alleviated with rest, is typically described as a deep…

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Grand Rounds: “Behcet’s Disease: What It Is, and Isn’t”

October 16, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Behcet’s Disease: What It Is, and Isn’t”

Commentary by Jon-Emile Kenny MD, PGY- 2

Please also see the clinical vignette presented during last week’s grand rounds

Dr.  Yusuf Yazici of the NYU Behcet’s Syndrome Center opened his talk by discussing the classic triad of symptoms characteristic of Behcet’s Disease: aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers and uveitis.  This was originally characterized by the Turkish physician Hulusi Behcet in 1937.  While these symptoms are the most common of Behcet’s, other tissues may be affected as Behcet’s is a systemic vasculitic disorder.  GI symptoms, neurological sequelae, the pathergy…

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Breaking News: USPSTF Recommends Against Routine Screening for Colorectal Cancer After Age 75

October 8, 2008

Commentary by Andrew McKinstry MD, PGY-1 (reviewed by Michael Poles, MD, Associate Editor Clinical Correlations, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology)

Hot on the heels of its recommendation in August against routine screening for prostate cancer in men over 75, the US Preventive Services Task Force has issued recommendations against routine screening for colorectal cancer in patients over the age of 75- Yes, you read that correctly, NO routine screening for colorectal cancer past age 75.  In a report updating their recommendations from 2002, the…

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