Systems

How Safe Is That Tattoo?

April 27, 2011
How Safe Is That Tattoo?

By Farzon A. Nahvi

Faculty Peer Reviewed

 Once thought to be exclusively the domain of gang members, prisoners, and those in the military, tattoos are now increasingly popular with the general population. The increasing visibility of tattoos on high-profile individuals such as athletes, musicians, and actors, combined with the increasing acceptability of tattoos among professionals, have made tattoos a common part of modern culture. Nevertheless, tattoo artists are subject to little regulation, and tattoo art comes with some real health risks. With an estimated 15% …

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From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Do Power Lines Cause Cancer?

April 14, 2011
From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Do Power Lines Cause Cancer?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted May 20, 2009

By Aditya Mattoo, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Prompted by personal experience, I thought I would explore the alleged causative role of power lines in hematologic malignancies for the next installment of Myths and Realities. In recent years, two close family friends living at separate locations but in homes adjacent to lots with electrical transformers were diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Naturally, the coincidence was not unnoticed, so I decided …

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The Porcelain Terror: Can a Toilet Give You Gonorrhea?

April 13, 2011
The Porcelain Terror: Can a Toilet Give You Gonorrhea?

By Bradley Ching, Class of 2011

Faculty Peer Reviewed

 What do every road trip, football game halftime, and trans-continental plane flight have in common? Usually a disgusting toilet paired with the urgent need of people to use them. While no one takes pleasure from these encounters, could they in fact be a risk for acquiring a sexually transmitted disease?

Gonorrhea or “the clap,” as it is lovingly nicknamed, is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and is most commonly transmitted via sexual intercourse.  It is …

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Case of the Month: Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Psoas Abscess with Acinetobacter Baumanii: Report of an Unusual Case

April 6, 2011
Case of the Month: Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Psoas Abscess with Acinetobacter Baumanii: Report of an Unusual Case

By Michael C. Brabeck, MD,  Adam Davis, MD, and Shaun Rodgers, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

 Case:

A 56-year-old male was admitted to Bellevue Hospital Center with chronic back pain and a three month history of subjective fevers, decreased appetite, and a thirty pound weight loss. His past medical history was remarkable only for chronic alcohol abuse. He denied other substance abuse. There were no previous health care facility exposures, and the patient had no history of military service. The physical examination upon admission was notable …

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An Intern In The ER

April 1, 2011
An Intern In The ER

By Demetrios Tzimas, MD

New York City.  Bellevue Hospital Center.  July 17, 2009.  1:53 pm.  Intern Year. Long Call.

“Go down to the ER.  There’s a guy with chest pain for the past three days, EKG shows some non-specific changes, vitals stable.  First set of labs negative.  CXR clear.  They gave him a full-dose aspirin.  This sounds like a rule out chest pain, and since it’s Friday, he’ll go to medicine and not the chest pain unit.  I’d go down with you, but one of …

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From The Archives: Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

March 31, 2011
From The Archives: Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted May 7, 2009

Seema Pursnani, MD

Because your parents have designated you as the family doctor, your Uncle Joe calls to ask you if he should take this medication called Diamox before going trekking in the Himalayas. You work at Bellevue in New York City: who climbs mountains here? What do you say?

Why do illnesses develop from changes in altitude?

The essential culprit is the fall in atmospheric pressure with an increase in …

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Is Dark Chocolate Good For You?

March 30, 2011
Is Dark Chocolate Good For You?

By Lisa Parikh, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

I was recently counseling an overweight patient about nutrition and exercise when he asked, “Doc, is it true what they say about dark chocolate being good for you?” I told him that although I had heard about this, I was actually not too sure about the evidence behind this. As a strong supporter of the “I wish that the best tasting foods were good for you” club, I decided this was the type of research that warranted my …

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From The Archives: The Skinny on Cachexia…Can it be Treated?

March 24, 2011
From The Archives: The Skinny on Cachexia…Can it be Treated?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted April 22, 2009

Michael T. Tees, MD, MPH

On the wards and in the clinic, the physician is frequently presented with a patient with a decreased appetite and alarming weight loss. The patient is likely frustrated with their own fraility, the family is upset at the poor nutritional state of their loved one, but the healthcare provider should be the most concerned. This clinical presentation without a prior diagnosis is worrisome, and if the …

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