Systems

Addiction 2.0 Part 1

August 27, 2008
Addiction 2.0 Part 1

Commentary by Joshua Lee MD, Ellie Grossman MD and Marc Gourevitch MD, NYU Division of General Internal Medicine

Substance abuse remains a leading cause of disease and mortality in the US, yet it is rarely addressed in general practice settings. In the past, clinicians could point to a relative paucity of effective interventions by way of explaining their disengagement in the care of these medical disorders. In recent years, however, effective pharmacotherapies have emerged for two classes of substances that are particularly destructive when abused,…

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Breaking News: Revenge of the Gila Monster?

August 20, 2008
Breaking News: Revenge of the Gila Monster?

Commentary by Rachana Jani MD, PGY-2

As recently reported in ShortCuts, Byetta recently made headlines after the suggestion of a mortality benefit for patients taking the drug in a small subset of the Accord study.  So is this the new golden drug for diabetics? Perhaps not. This week, the FDA updated a previous alert warning providers about the risks of pancreatitis in patients taking Byetta. Last October, the FDA first issued an alert after there had been 30 postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis in patients who had recently been started on Byetta. Though…

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Class Act: Pathogenesis of Rheumatic Heart Disease

August 14, 2008
Class Act: Pathogenesis of Rheumatic Heart Disease

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Matt Stein MS-4; Reviewed by Harold Horowitz MD, Professor, NYU Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

In general, acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a delayed sequela of a group A streptococcus (GAS) pharyngeal infection. Following an initial throat infection, which is often either untreated or incompletely treated, there exists a latent period of two…

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FRAX: A Brand New Tool For the Management of Osteoporosis

August 13, 2008
FRAX: A Brand New Tool For the Management of Osteoporosis

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations. Reviewed by Valerie Peck MD, NYU Division of Endocrinology.

An 81 year old Caucasian woman with a history of diabetes and hypertension who was admitted to the orthopedic service with a hip fracture after falling in her home.

This is a typical story and represents the end stages of osteoporosis. It is the myocardial infarction of the bone world. Like cardiovascular disease, prevention and identification of at-risk individuals is the most powerful tool clinicians have…

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How Do You Approach a Patient with Arthritis and Hepatitis C?

August 7, 2008
How Do You Approach a Patient with Arthritis and Hepatitis C?

Commentary by Peter Izmirly MD, NYU Division of Rheumatology

A 54 year old male with a past medical history significant for hepatitis C genotype 1a s/p ifn/ribavarin 2003-2004 with HCV Qual negative in 2005 presents with 3 weeks of bilateral wrist pain. The pain is worst with extension. His exam is notable for diffuse tenderness when pressure is applied to his wrists. He has no obvious swelling, erythema, deformity or subcutaneous nodules. The remainder of his musculoskeletal exam in unremarkable. In addition, he has no stigmata of cirrhosis. Labs…

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Breaking News: USPSTF Issues New Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines

August 5, 2008

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations

The US Preventive Services Task Force issued new guidelines for prostate cancer screening on Monday.  For the first time, the task force recommends AGAINST routine screening in patients over 75 years of age, citing the “moderate to substantial” harms over small to no benefits from screening. The task force reports that there continues to be inadequate evidence that the PSA improves healthcare outcomes at any age.  However, even if there is eventual evidence that screening is beneficial in younger patients, because men over…

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Class Act: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome 2.0

August 1, 2008
Class Act: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome 2.0

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Marty Wolff MS-4, and Susan Zweig MD, Clinical Instructor, NYU Division of Endocrinology

NH is a 32 year-old obese Hispanic female with a history of…

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Dietary Issues after Bariatric Surgery

July 18, 2008
Dietary Issues after Bariatric Surgery

Commentary by Melissa Freeman MD, Endocrinology Section Editor

A new outpatient Bariatric Surgery Clinic recently opened at Bellevue Hospital Center. This clinic offers laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding to patients 18 years of age or older who meet specific BMI and medical criteria. This life-altering surgery is now covered by Medicaid and those who are uninsured can work with financial counselors to obtain funding through special HHC programs. While the surgeons diligently educate their patients on their dietary transitions and requirements after surgery, primary care physicians,…

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Class Act: What is the risk of microbial keratitis in overnight wear of soft contact lenses?

July 11, 2008
Class Act: What is the risk of microbial keratitis in overnight wear of soft contact lenses?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Frank Siringo, NYU Medical Student

Soft contact lens wear is the primary risk factor for microbial keratitis, a potentially vision-threatening infection of the cornea, with a…

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Breaking news: FDA issues new Boxed Warning for Fluoroquinolones

July 10, 2008
Breaking news: FDA issues new Boxed Warning for Fluoroquinolones

Commentary by Marilena S. Antonopoulos, PharmD, Pharmacology Editor

On July 8th, the FDA notified the manufacturers of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drugs that a Boxed Warning in the product labeling and a Medication Guide for patients concerning the increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture is necessary. The FDA conducted a new analysis of the available literature and post-marketing adverse event reports which reconfirms that the use of fluoroquinolones is associated with an increased risk of tendon rupture.

The risk of developing fluoroquinolone-associated tendinitis and tendon rupture…

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Admission screening cultures for MRSA: Is it time?

July 9, 2008
Admission screening cultures for MRSA: Is it time?

Commentary by Howard Leaf, M.D. Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology 

Pressure continues to build for healthcare facilities to act to decrease hospital-acquired infections, particularly those associated with MRSA. This is partly data-driven, with one study reporting that 25% of patients acquiring MRSA colonization during a hospitalization subsequently become infected . The call to act is also partly a political response to concerns in the lay press about “superbugs” wreaking havoc both in hospitals and in the community. Seven states have…

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Diseases 2.0: Uric acid stones linked to diabetes

July 3, 2008
Diseases 2.0: Uric acid stones linked to diabetes

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary By David Goldfarb, M.D. Professor of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Chief Nephrology Section VA New York Harbor

At the recent meeting of the National Kidney Foundation in Dallas, Dr. Orson Moe reviewed the links between diabetes and uric acid stones . Uric acid stones are most often caused by low urine pH. With a low urine pH, even relatively little uric acid can precipate, as it forms the protonated form, which…

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