Systems

Myths and Realities: Does Vitamin C Work for the Common Cold?

January 7, 2011
Myths and Realities: Does Vitamin C Work for the Common Cold?

By Carolyn Bevan,  MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

It starts with a tickle in your throat.  You feel a bit more tired after a day’s work, maybe your forehead feels a little warm.  You try to will it away, but over the next few days, it hits you: the congestion, runny nose and annoying cough.  Much to your dismay, you have a cold.  Determined not to give in without a fight, you drag yourself to the nearest drug store and buy the first mega-dose vitamin C …

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From The Archives – Deciphering Fact from Fiction in Hypoglycemia

January 6, 2011
From The Archives – Deciphering Fact from Fiction in Hypoglycemia

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted March 26, 2009

By: Melissa Price, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 42 year-old male phlebotomist with a history of anxiety presented to the emergency room complaining of four hours of dizziness and diaphoresis. He denied taking any medications. His vitals were stable, his physical exam was significant for a lethargic, diaphoretic young man without focal findings, and his fingerstick value was 43mg/dL. His chest X-ray, EKG, and laboratory results, with the exception of plasma …

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Early Repolarization: Not as Innocent as Once Thought!

January 5, 2011
Early Repolarization: Not as Innocent as Once Thought!

By Rachel Bond, MD PGY-2

Faculty Peer Reviewed

For many years, the electrocardiogram, a seemingly simple transthoracic interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart captured and externally recorded, has fascinated healthcare professionals.  An aspect of the electrocardiogram which has piqued curiosity consist of an interesting pattern referred to as “early repolarization.”  Early repolarization is a slurring or notching producing a hump-like feature called a J wave, typically found at the junction at the end of the QRS complex and the beginning of the ST …

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Meeting Perspectives: The 2010 Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) Meeting

December 22, 2010
Meeting Perspectives: The 2010 Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) Meeting

Neal H. Steigbigel, M.D.

The recent IDSA meeting reviewed many important and interesting findings.  Topics spanned a wide array of subjects, many of which are of importance and interest to all physicians.  These subjects included:

Treating severe Clostridial Difficile infection with fecal transplantation Isolation for extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL’s) bacteremia Update in multi-resistant gram negative infections Update on Pneumococccal infections Treatment dilemmas in immunocompromised hosts Update on invasive fungal infections

This high quality meeting has many simultaneous sessions and therefore one individual cannot cover …

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Is a Low Vitamin D Level a Risk Factor for Colon Cancer?

December 16, 2010
Is a Low Vitamin D Level a Risk Factor for Colon Cancer?

By Nelson Sanchez, MD and Fritz Francois, MD, MS

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 45-year-old woman presents to your office for an annual check-up.  She states that her grandmother was recently diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 90, and she wants to know what she can do to reduce her own risk for the disease.  She recently read an article about the benefits of vitamin D and wants to know if they extend to protecting against colon cancer. In particular, she is concerned

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The Polymyxins: Why am I using them all the time, and what are they?

December 8, 2010
The Polymyxins: Why am I using them all the time, and what are they?

By Jon-Emile S Kenny

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 65-year-old female with locally advanced rectal cancer is admitted to the ICU, hypotensive and febrile.  Her PICC line is removed and blood cultures drawn.  Fourty-eight hours later all cultures return ESBL Klebsiella with susceptibility only to polymyxin.

I sat on the venerable call-room couch staring mindlessly at the cluttered, nauseating walls repeating the word ‘polymyxin’ like an endless antimicrobial mantra.  What strange dosing it has, and an even more peculiar name.

The polymyxins (B and E – …

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Branched Chain Amino Acid Supplementation for Patients with Cirrhosis

December 3, 2010
Branched Chain Amino Acid Supplementation for Patients with Cirrhosis

By Nicole Leigh Aaronson,MD,  Loren Wissner Greene, MD, and  Denise Pate, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Introduction:

Whereas there are specially designed diets for patients with hypertension, diabetes, and renal failure, NYU Medical Center, like most medical centers, does not have a specific diet for patients with cirrhosis. In considering what dietary modifications might benefit these patients, it is useful to first examine the nutritional status of the cirrhotic patient. Cirrhosis is a disease characterized by progressive liver injury and hepatocyte death, which eventually produces fibrosis …

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Kayexalate: What is it and does it work?

December 1, 2010
Kayexalate: What is it and does it work?

By Todd Cutler, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 62-year-old male is hospitalized with an acute congestive heart failure exacerbation. On hospital day three, the patient’s symptoms have significantly improved with twice daily furosemide 80mg IV. He is continued on IV diuretics and aggressive electrolyte repletion. On day five of his admission, his basic metabolic panel is significant for a creatinine of 2.3 mg/dL (increased from 1.3 on admission) and a potassium concentration of 5.9 mEq/L. His EKG is unchanged from admission. His furosemide is discontinued

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