Class Act

A Trip Through the Granola Vortex

February 10, 2017
A Trip Through the Granola Vortex

By Michael J Hession

Peer Reviewed

Twenty blocks south of NYU Langone and steps east of First Avenue on 9th Street sits New York’s go-to supplier of fresh herbs, tinctures, and oils. Owned and operated since 1993 by Lata Chettri-Kennedy—The Green Witch of the East Village—Flower Power Herbs and Roots Inc. is lined floor-to-ceiling with shelves of cut and dried product in mason jars. A purple bumper sticker behind the counter proclaims “Health Care for People, Not for Profit,” and another infographic ranking peppers from …

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The Forbidden Fruit

January 27, 2017
The Forbidden Fruit

By Varun Narendra

Peer Reviewed

Griffith Hughes was the first to describe the grapefruit in 1750, naming it the “forbidden fruit” of Barbados for unknown reasons. Centuries later, it seems as if he may have been on to something, as grapefruit juice (GFJ) has been shown potentially to interact dangerously with a list of commonly prescribed medications. This list has steadily grown to include over 85 drugs.1 Meanwhile, the Internet is rife with anecdotes of near-death experiences attributed to drug interactions with the much-maligned fruit. …

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Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

September 16, 2016
Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

By Andrew Hallett

Peer Reviewed 

For decades, surveys and public data have shown staggeringly high rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, and depression among physicians when compared to the general population.1-4 Male doctors are 40% more likely to commit suicide than other men, and female doctors are 130% more likely to do so than other women, according to a 2004 analysis in the American Journal of Psychiatry.5 With expanded access to care and new regulatory requirements under the Affordable Care Act increasing pressure on doctors, a …

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Physicians and Medical Innovation

April 15, 2016
Physicians and Medical Innovation

By Vivek Kumar

Peer Reviewed

As healthcare workers, we learn about the most intimate factors governing patients’ lives. We learn about their fears, goals, and motivations on a daily basis. We are on the front lines and see the cracks in the system that prevent optimal health. With all of this privileged knowledge, healthcare workers should be at the forefront of medical innovation. Surprisingly, however, very few physicians engage in entrepreneurship, despite the significant need and variety of roles available .

In the current medical …

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Exercise-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: How Fitness May Actually Be Hurting You

March 17, 2016
Exercise-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: How Fitness May Actually Be Hurting You

By Jessica Morgan

Peer Reviewed

CrossFit and SoulCycle. To many people these words mean nothing. However, ask any twenty-something or college student and they will probably tell you they have participated in a class or two, or have a friend who participates. Depending on whom you approach, you might even get the sense that these are not just exercise classes, but more like a spiritual experience or a tight-knit community of like-minded individuals, all striving for physical excellence. Some have accused these programs of being …

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Don’t Tie Me Down! Do Neckties Spread Infection?

February 24, 2016
Don’t Tie Me Down! Do Neckties Spread Infection?

By Gabriel Campion

Peer Reviewed

For over a century, neckties have been a staple accessory in the wardrobe of the American professional man. Although white-collar dress codes have trended toward a more casual style, the quintessential physician still wears the white coat, a stethoscope draped around the neck, and, if male, a necktie. This is understandable. No one would accuse a profession using an oath that originally swore “by Apollo the Physician and by Aesculapius ” to be one that easily strays from tradition. However, …

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Hirudotherapy: An Ugly Means of Avoiding Uglier Outcomes

January 22, 2016
Hirudotherapy: An Ugly Means of Avoiding Uglier Outcomes

By Jonathan Bekisz

Peer Reviewed

“Do you want to see something gross? Go into the soiled utility room and check out what’s in the jar.” Never one to pass on the opportunity to “see something gross,” I poked my head in and examined the tiny glass jar that sat on the counter. Living up to its billing, within the container sat about a half dozen leeches. Contrary to my assumption that any role these segmented worms had in the field of medicine went away with …

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Lies My Patients Told Me: “I Take My Medications Every Day.”

January 15, 2016
Lies My Patients Told Me: “I Take My Medications Every Day.”

By Rebecca Sussman

Peer Reviewed

Reviewing medical evidence has become such a habit that sometimes it feels almost impossible to think independently. I’ve always been a top-down thinker; I go with my gut instinct, and then look for the evidence to support my assessment.

The problem is that very often it feels like what patients need most is not the precision of a particular etiology or the selection of a medication that is perfectly and precisely tailored to their condition and comorbidities; what they need …

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