Neuro

Botox: Not Just for Wrinkles Anymore

July 28, 2016
Botox: Not Just for Wrinkles Anymore

Samantha Kass Newman, MD

Peer Reviewed

You can get a Botox injection almost anywhere these days. Internists, dermatologists, and even gynecologists have capitalized on an aging group of baby boomers who aren’t fans of their wrinkles. And it’s true that with an impressive safety profile, few contraindications, rapid effectiveness, and positive cash return for providers, botulinum toxin injections for cosmetic purposes can make everyone happy.

Botulinim toxin is produced by the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. This is the strongest toxin found in nature. When injected …

Read more »

Stroke 2.0: Novel methods of Detection, Selection and Intervention in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

June 29, 2016
Stroke 2.0: Novel methods of Detection, Selection and Intervention in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

By David Valentine, MD

Peer Reviewed

Stroke is among the costliest disorders in the world for both individuals and society. Every hour of an evolving stroke kills 120 million neurons, destroys 830 billion synapses and degrades 714 kilometers of myelinated fibers, aging the brain by 3.6 years in those 60 minutes1. It is the leading cause of adult disability in the USA, currently costing $70 billion a year2 with $2.2 trillion more projected over the next forty years3. The global burden is even higher.

Despite …

Read more »

The Brain’s Effect on the Heart After a Stroke

June 22, 2016
The Brain’s Effect on the Heart After a Stroke

By Rory Abrams, MD

Peer Reviewed 

The heart and brain are hopelessly intertwined. Their connection is greater than the tissues and sinews that physically tether them to the human body, and can be understood in three ways: 1) how the heart affects the brain, 2) how the brain affects the heart, and 3) how the heart and brain are both affected by various neuro-cardiac syndromes.  The heart’s effects on the brain are illustrated when there is hypoperfusion of the brain resulting in syncope, or when …

Read more »

The Great Marijuana Debate – Effects on Psychosis and Cognition

August 13, 2015
The Great Marijuana Debate – Effects on Psychosis and Cognition

By Kristina Cieslak, MD

Peer Reviewed 

The heavily debated gradual decriminalization and legalization of marijuana will likely result in easier access for all ages. An informed debate has been stymied, however, by a lack of prospective data examining the various long-term effects of marijuana use on the brain, particularly among adolescents who use it heavily. This year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) initiated the “National Longitudinal Study of the Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Substance Use.” This study will follow a large cohort of children …

Read more »

Help Versus Hope: Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer’s Disease

May 21, 2014
Help Versus Hope: Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer’s Disease

By Jonathan Gursky

Peer Reviewed

Approximately 5.2 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) , with this number expected to triple by the year 2050 . Alzheimer’s disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for $100 billion in healthcare expenditures each year . Nevertheless, the most devastating and far-reaching effects of Alzheimer’s disease hit close to home. While those with the disease progressively lose their memory, speech, and independence, it is the caretaker who …

Read more »

Can crossword puzzles prevent dementia?

March 12, 2014
Can crossword puzzles prevent dementia?

By Theresa Sumberac, MD

Peer Reviewed

The 2008 US Census Bureau reported that 14 to 16 percent of the adult population enjoyed crossword puzzles and that half of them played crossword puzzles at least twice a week. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if all those hours spent finishing the Sunday crossword puzzle were good for your health? Recent evidence shows that this may be the case. By 2030 the US population over 65 will double to more than 70 million, highlighting the need to investigate …

Read more »

Concussions and Football By The Numbers

December 6, 2013
Concussions and Football By The Numbers

By Benjamin G. Wu

Peer Reviewed

The news of a large $675 million dollar settlement on concussions has headlined on both the sports news channels and in popular media during this 2013 National Football League (N.F.L.) season . Heralded as a victory mainly for the N.F.L., the settlement not only allows the league to avoid larger amounts in potential liability payments but also the public scrutiny of a discovery phase if a case were to move forward . In the wake of this settlement there …

Read more »

Mystery Quiz- The Answer

June 29, 2012

Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The answer to the mystery quiz is thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. The clue to the case is the intermittent dysphagia and chewing difficulty. If one considers myasthenia in the differential, then an otherwise grossly normal appearing chest radiograph may be viewed more closely, with attention directed to the upper, anterior mediastinum. The chest radiograph shows the ascending aorta (image 3, arrow); on the lateral film, the retrosternal space, which normally contains air, appears …

Read more »

Use it or Lose it- Do cognitive leisure activities protect against the development of Alzheimer’s?

March 30, 2012
Use it or Lose it- Do cognitive leisure activities protect against the development of Alzheimer’s?

By Courtney Cunningham, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

As the world population ages, enormous resources will be required to adequately care for persons suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The disease is the fifth leading cause of death for adults aged 65 years and older, and is estimated to affect 1 in 8 persons in this age group. Despite recent advances, the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is not well understood. The FDA-approved medications in common use—donepezil (Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne), rivastigmine (Exelon), and memantine (Namenda)–help to manage symptoms; however …

Read more »

How Should You Choose the Best Anti-platelet Agents for Secondary Stroke Prevention?

February 16, 2012
How Should You Choose the Best Anti-platelet Agents for Secondary Stroke Prevention?

By Demetrios Tzimas, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

You are about to discharge a 75-year-old female with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, who was admitted to the hospital for an ischemic stroke. Being an astute physician, you would like to mitigate this patient’s risk of having a second stroke. But you ask yourself, “with all of the agents available today, what anti-platelet agents should I put this patient on to decrease her risk for a second stroke?”

The etiology of an ischemic stroke, as defined by …

Read more »

Dance Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease: Can the Argentine Tango Improve Motor Function?

December 2, 2011
Dance Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease: Can the Argentine Tango Improve Motor Function?

By Neha Jindal

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder that affects over 1 million people in the United States. People with PD often demonstrate postural instability, gait difficulties, and impaired functional mobility, which can lead to falls and decreased quality of life. Medical treatments for PD do not fully address gait and balance issues and, consequently, additional approaches are needed. One approach that has recently emerged in clinical studies is the use of dance, particularly the Argentine tango, as …

Read more »

Vegetative State 2.0

May 13, 2011
Vegetative State 2.0

By Ivan Saraiva, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

 “Mr. Dockery was a police officer in the town of Walden, northwest of Chattanooga, when he was shot in the forehead as he responded to a call on Sept. 17, 1988. He has been motionless and speechless in a nursing home most of the time since then but was recently moved to Columbia Parkridge Medical Center here because of a lung infection. Suddenly, on Monday, he spoke, amazing his family and physicians.” (NY Times, February 17, 1996)

 What …

Read more »