Psychiatry

Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

February 3, 2017
Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

By Nicole Van Groningen, MD

Peer Reviewed

Although the “stress of the holidays” is a phrase used to refer to the multitude of to-do lists and travel obligations associated with the 6-week stretch between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, the pleasant emotional state associated with the season remains one of the most important positive influences on the American psyche. Chief among these warm emotions is an emphasis on gratitude for the people, relationships, opportunities, and circumstances we cherish. As the holiday season comes to a …

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Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

September 16, 2016
Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

By Andrew Hallett

Peer Reviewed 

For decades, surveys and public data have shown staggeringly high rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, and depression among physicians when compared to the general population.1-4 Male doctors are 40% more likely to commit suicide than other men, and female doctors are 130% more likely to do so than other women, according to a 2004 analysis in the American Journal of Psychiatry.5 With expanded access to care and new regulatory requirements under the Affordable Care Act increasing pressure on doctors, a …

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Generation A(dderall)

October 17, 2013
Generation A(dderall)

By Michael Weinstock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Neurocognitive enhancement with mixed amphetamine salts (MAS) has grown commonplace in academic settings. Over 34% of college students at a large public university reported using MAS as a study aid at least once in their life . Other researchers have found prevalence rates ranging from 13.7% lifetime use at another large public university to 55% lifetime use among fraternity members at a large public university . Abuse and misuse of stimulants does not stop after four years of college, …

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Morgellons: Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

October 3, 2012
Morgellons: Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

By Robert Mazgaj

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Morgellons disease is an “unexplained dermopathy” characterized by fibers emerging from skin lesions, and associated with various cutaneous sensations. Inspired by a curious medical condition reported by a 17th century English physician, Morgellons was actually named in 2002 by Mary Leitao, a layperson, to describe the mysterious set of symptoms reportedly suffered by her then 2-year-old son. Leitao then launched the not-for-profit Morgellons Research Foundation (MRF) along with a (no longer active) website, www.morgellons.org. MRF successfully petitioned members of …

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Mental Health Considerations for Gay and Lesbian Patients

July 27, 2011
Mental Health Considerations for Gay and Lesbian Patients

By Benjamin Cox

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Gay men and lesbian women are members of a stigmatized minority group and evidence suggests that they may disproportionately utilize mental health services. This increased use of mental health services may be related to the concept of minority stress: that stigma, prejudice, discrimination, and violence create a hostile and stressful social environment that can contribute to mental health problems. Examples of external stressors that pose threats to mental health in gay and lesbian patients include verbal and physical violence, …

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A Vaccine Against Nicotine—New Hope or Mere Hype?

February 18, 2011
A Vaccine Against Nicotine—New Hope or Mere Hype?

By Carolan Hass, Class of 2012

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Cigarettes remain an anathema to many physicians.  Like so many unhealthy behaviors over which a clinician has little control, it can be frustrating to deal with a habit that can do so much harm to a patient, but which may be deeply entrenched in his daily life.  Although the percentage of current cigarette-smoking US adults has steadily decreased from 34.1% in 1978 to 19.8% in 2007 there remains vast room for improvement.  A fifty-percent reduction …

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Motivational Interviewing: Can You Really Change Behaviors?

April 27, 2010
Motivational Interviewing: Can You Really Change Behaviors?

Emily Stamell

Faculty peer reviewed

As a well-trained fourth year medical student, I inquire about smoking habits as part of almost all my patient encounters. Yet, I do not recall properly counseling a patient on smoking cessation aside from the one liner “You know you should quit, right?” During first and second year of medical school we are taught the stages of change model, which is just as obscure two years later as cell signaling pathways. I was recently introduced to what seemed like an …

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Addiction 2.0 Part 2

September 4, 2008
Addiction 2.0 Part 2

Commentary by Joshua Lee MD, Ellie Grossman MD and Marc Gourevitch MD, NYU Division of General Internal Medicine

Please also see Part 1 of this series, posted last week

Alcohol treatment in primary care: evidence for effectiveness and neharmacotherapies

Brief interventions by primary care physicians to address unhealthy alcohol use have been shown in multiple studies and settings to promote reduced drinking and engagement in other treatment, although long-term impact on alcohol-related morbidity and mortality is not clear.(Saitz 2005) Standard brief intervention techniques are based …

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