Breaking news: FDA issues new Boxed Warning for Fluoroquinolones

July 10, 2008
Breaking news: FDA issues new Boxed Warning for Fluoroquinolones

Commentary by Marilena S. Antonopoulos, PharmD, Pharmacology Editor

On July 8th, the FDA notified the manufacturers of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drugs that a Boxed Warning in the product labeling and a Medication Guide for patients concerning the increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture is necessary. The FDA conducted a new analysis of the available literature and post-marketing adverse event reports which reconfirms that the use of fluoroquinolones is associated with an increased risk of tendon rupture.

The risk of developing fluoroquinolone-associated tendinitis and tendon rupture…

Read more »

Admission screening cultures for MRSA: Is it time?

July 9, 2008
Admission screening cultures for MRSA: Is it time?

Commentary by Howard Leaf, M.D. Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology 

Pressure continues to build for healthcare facilities to act to decrease hospital-acquired infections, particularly those associated with MRSA. This is partly data-driven, with one study reporting that 25% of patients acquiring MRSA colonization during a hospitalization subsequently become infected . The call to act is also partly a political response to concerns in the lay press about “superbugs” wreaking havoc both in hospitals and in the community. Seven states have…

Read more »

ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

July 7, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Happy July 4th!  As we celebrate our nation’s 232nd birthday, I sit here wondering what “shortcuts” might have looked like in 1776.  Smallpox inoculation might have made the cut.  Apparently people like Thomas Jefferson inoculated themselves and their families against this dreaded disease via inhalation.  It wasn’t until 20 years later, in 1796, that Dr. Edward Jenner discovered that he could protect people from smallpox by vaccinating them using cowpox. …

Read more »

Diseases 2.0: Uric acid stones linked to diabetes

July 3, 2008
Diseases 2.0: Uric acid stones linked to diabetes

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary By David Goldfarb, M.D. Professor of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Chief Nephrology Section VA New York Harbor

At the recent meeting of the National Kidney Foundation in Dallas, Dr. Orson Moe reviewed the links between diabetes and uric acid stones . Uric acid stones are most often caused by low urine pH. With a low urine pH, even relatively little uric acid can precipate, as it forms the protonated form, which…

Read more »

Welcome to Clinical Correlations 2.0

July 1, 2008
Welcome to Clinical Correlations 2.0

317 posts, 67,000 unique visitors from 167 different countries and almost 100,000 hits later and we’re still here. It’s time we evolved…

Welcome to Clinical Correlations Version 2.0. What better day than July 1st, the start of the academic year to celebrate our success with a total redesign of our site. Our new tagline says it all: “A Daily Dose of Medicine.” We are looking to be your destination on the internet to receive a morsel of internal medicine wisdom every day.

Click around and…

Read more »

ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

June 30, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Danise Schiliro- Chuang MD

Welcome to the wide world of shortcuts. While I hope this post comes to you from your laptop while you’re relaxing on the beach with a cool drink, I realize this is likely not the case. Hopefully, reading this post will be refreshing enough.

Also before we start, a warm welcome to the new intern class! We hope that you’re settling in to life as an MD with ease and that you will enjoy shortcuts for…

Read more »

Mystery Quiz- The Answer

June 26, 2008
Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Posted by Athena Kritharis MS-3, Vivian Hayashi MD, Instructor of Clinical Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Robert Smith MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

 

Image 1     

 

 

 Image 2

The answer to last week’s mystery quiz is giant hemangioma. The CT is highly suggestive of the diagnosis given the peripheral enhancement with hypodense center (Image 1). Had the study been done dynamically, the contrast would have moved centrally. Contrast…

Read more »

Aspirin Use in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

June 25, 2008
Aspirin Use in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

Commentary by Daniel Frenkel, MD PGY-2 and Aleksandar Adzic, MD PGY-2 (in consultation with Greg Mints, MD Attending Physician, General Internal Medicine)

Case #1: A 47 year old man with no significant medical history, nonsmoker, and no family history of CAD. Blood pressure 124/72 Cholesterol 202, LDL 129, HDL 35, Triglycerides 190.
Case #2: A 36 year old man history of hypertension controlled with hydrochlorothiazide, smoker, with no family history of CAD. Blood pressure 134/72 Cholesterol 168, LDL 91, HDL 46, Triglycerides 155.

Would you…

Read more »