Dietary Issues after Bariatric Surgery

July 18, 2008
Dietary Issues after Bariatric Surgery

Commentary by Melissa Freeman MD, Endocrinology Section Editor

A new outpatient Bariatric Surgery Clinic recently opened at Bellevue Hospital Center. This clinic offers laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding to patients 18 years of age or older who meet specific BMI and medical criteria. This life-altering surgery is now covered by Medicaid and those who are uninsured can work with financial counselors to obtain funding through special HHC programs. While the surgeons diligently educate their patients on their dietary transitions and requirements after surgery, primary care physicians,…

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Clinical Pathology Conference 7/08

July 17, 2008
Clinical Pathology Conference 7/08

Case presentation by James Tsay, Chief Resident

Welcome to the monthly posting of our NYU Department of Medicine’s Clinical Pathology Conference. Use the link below to review the case, followed by a slide presentation of the radiological findings. Feel free to make your diagnosis by clicking the comment field. We will reveal the answer next week.

Clinical Pathology Conference Case Presentation

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More Health Care Is Not Better

July 16, 2008
More Health Care Is Not Better

Surprising results from the Datmouth Atlas of Health Care

Commentary by Zackary Berger MD PhD, PGY-3, Health Care Policy Section Editor

What explains the large variation in health care costs across the country? You would expect that the regions with the highest health care expenditures have the sickest patients, or have the highest prevalence of chronic health conditions.

But you would be wrong. Health care expenditures are highest where health care supply is the highest. As the number of hospital beds,…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

July 14, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Bani Chander MD, PGY-3 

Childhood obesity, foodborne illness and the evil pharmaceutical industy…sorry to start your day off with some gloomy topics, but the news is full of it these days. Let’s get started.

Childhood obesity, as we know, has been on the rise, and children are starting not only to eat, but to walk, talk, and act like adults. Now should we also start treating them like adults? This week, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a new

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Class Act: What is the risk of microbial keratitis in overnight wear of soft contact lenses?

July 11, 2008
Class Act: What is the risk of microbial keratitis in overnight wear of soft contact lenses?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Frank Siringo, NYU Medical Student

Soft contact lens wear is the primary risk factor for microbial keratitis, a potentially vision-threatening infection of the cornea, with a…

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Breaking news: FDA issues new Boxed Warning for Fluoroquinolones

July 10, 2008
Breaking news: FDA issues new Boxed Warning for Fluoroquinolones

Commentary by Marilena S. Antonopoulos, PharmD, Pharmacology Editor

On July 8th, the FDA notified the manufacturers of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drugs that a Boxed Warning in the product labeling and a Medication Guide for patients concerning the increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture is necessary. The FDA conducted a new analysis of the available literature and post-marketing adverse event reports which reconfirms that the use of fluoroquinolones is associated with an increased risk of tendon rupture.

The risk of developing fluoroquinolone-associated tendinitis and tendon rupture…

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Admission screening cultures for MRSA: Is it time?

July 9, 2008
Admission screening cultures for MRSA: Is it time?

Commentary by Howard Leaf, M.D. Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology 

Pressure continues to build for healthcare facilities to act to decrease hospital-acquired infections, particularly those associated with MRSA. This is partly data-driven, with one study reporting that 25% of patients acquiring MRSA colonization during a hospitalization subsequently become infected . The call to act is also partly a political response to concerns in the lay press about “superbugs” wreaking havoc both in hospitals and in the community. Seven states have…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

July 7, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Happy July 4th!  As we celebrate our nation’s 232nd birthday, I sit here wondering what “shortcuts” might have looked like in 1776.  Smallpox inoculation might have made the cut.  Apparently people like Thomas Jefferson inoculated themselves and their families against this dreaded disease via inhalation.  It wasn’t until 20 years later, in 1796, that Dr. Edward Jenner discovered that he could protect people from smallpox by vaccinating them using cowpox. …

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