Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

February 22, 2010
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

Emily Taylor, MD

Can your case of seasonal affective disorder be cured by a healthy dose of the Vancouver Olympics?  A commentary in this week’s JAMA addressed the Winter Olympics as a prime opportunity to promote safety helmets for alpine sports.  There are approximately 600,000 ski-slope injuries a year, of which 15-20% include traumatic brain injury. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission is quoted as claiming that 44% of these injuries are preventable by wearing a safety helmet, but despite these strong recommendations, helmets are …

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What Should We Know About Bedbugs?

February 18, 2010
What Should We Know About Bedbugs?

Jia Huang

Faculty peer reviewed

A 46 year-old Asian female presented with recurrent pruritic erythematous papules in a partially linear pattern over her forearms, face, and trunk. Each papule measured about 3/4 inch in diameter. The eruption first appeared two to three weeks ago and simultaneously appeared over these areas. She denies using any new skin products or taking any new medication. Travel history is positive for a recent trip to Los Angeles. Bedbugs were suspected and the patient was prescribed oral diphenhydramine and topical …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

February 15, 2010
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Rachel Bond, MD

Faculty peer reviewed

August 12, 2003. Rosuvastatin aka Crestor becomes FDA approved in combination with diet and exercise to increase HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), reduce total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein B, non-HDL cholesterol and triglycerides in patients with known hyperlipidemia and mixed dyslipidemia.  Additionally, guidelines propose the use of statins in patients with hyperlipidemia and diabetes and/or established vascular disease. These effects have been shown to slow down the progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately reduce the risk of cardiovascular …

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Zinc Cold Remedies: Are They Safe and Effective–Who Nose?

February 11, 2010
Zinc Cold Remedies: Are They Safe and Effective–Who Nose?

Amanda Benkoff

Faculty peer reviewed

Each year doctors are presented with the dilemma of the common cold. Adults in the U.S. experience an average of 3 colds per year, and children up to 8-10, resulting in over 500 million colds annually.(1) Patients often visit the doctor with cold symptoms requesting antibiotics. Since the etiology of the common cold is viral, antibiotic therapy is ineffective and inappropriate, and only contributes to bacterial antibiotic resistance. More than 200 viruses can cause the common cold, including rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

February 8, 2010
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Rachana Jani, MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Women’s health stepped into the spotlight this week as the public and the media painted New York City red for cardiovascular awareness.  And appropriately so, as new information about heart disease in women continues to emerge. In the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases, a population-based study found that elderly women with gout were at increased risk of acute myocardial infarction compared to men with this ailment.  De Vera et al found that women were at an increased overall risk of …

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Oldies but Goodies: How should you approach a low titer +RPR?

February 5, 2010
Oldies but Goodies: How should you approach a low titer +RPR?

Please enjoy a post from the Clinical Correlations Archives, first posted November 28, 2006…

45 year old male with a history of Hepatitis B ( Hep B Surf Ag + but Hep B E Ab+ and E Ag – and DNA viral load was not sent) and syphilis treated in the past. He has RPRs in the past that were 1:1 for years and then negative x 2 a year apart, the last being over two years ago. He had labs drawn last week and …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

February 1, 2010
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Carolina Cabral MD

Faculty peer reviewed

As the world continues to witness the earthquake aftermath in Haiti, the stories and statistics become more unsettling. As the New York Times reported this week, after the devastating earthquake struck what was already one of the world’s most impoverished nations, Haiti saw the collapse or severe damage of 20,000 commercial buildings and 225,000 residences (1). The death toll has risen above 150,000 in the Port-au-Prince area alone, not to mention those who remain unaccounted for in both Port-au-Prince …

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Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

January 30, 2010
Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

Mark D. Schwartz and Julia Hyland Bruno

Jeanne Calment rode her bicycle until age 100, quit smoking at 117, and died in 1977 at 122 years of age in Arles, France. This news-worthy story raises some questions: Why do we age at all? Why don’t we live forever? And many of us are asked by our patients, is old age a disease we can cure?

First, some useful distinctions: Aging is getting chronologically older, while senescence is physiologic degeneration that diminishes our function and vitality …

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