When Should You Obtain a Renal Biopsy? Indications, Risks, Follow-up and Value

September 30, 2009
When Should You Obtain a Renal Biopsy? Indications, Risks, Follow-up and Value

Frederick Gandolfo MD

Faculty peer reviewed

At a recent conference on renal transplantation, the importance of early renal biopsy for the diagnosis of acute rejection was emphasized. As busy practitioners of general internal medicine, we rarely have the opportunity to learn the details of a subspecialty procedure such as renal biopsy. However, knowing the details of these procedures is important in providing care for these specific patients. What are the indications, risks, and follow-up care required for the renal biopsy patient? In the native kidney …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

September 28, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Daria B. Crittenden MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

While health care reform is being hotly debated around the country, one aspect of reform on which most people can probably agree is that better preventive care would benefit us as individuals and as a society. The literature this week echoes this theme of preventive care.
The most recent Annals of Internal Medicine features an article investigating how often young adults utilize the primary care outpatient system and if they receive appropriate preventive care. This study looked at …

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Ask-A-Librarian Column: What Exactly Do You Do? A Clinician’s Guide to the Medical Librarian

September 25, 2009
Ask-A-Librarian Column: What Exactly Do You Do? A Clinician’s Guide to the Medical Librarian


Jamie Graham

You may have seen us at clinical rounds, faculty council, or IRB sessions. You may have wondered why a medical librarian would be present outside the library. Our exact function is often a mystery to clinicians, and so, we have decided to take this opportunity in our inaugural issue to introduce ourselves and tell you everything we have to offer.Our professional librarians at the NYU Health Sciences Libraries receive a Masters in Library Science (M.L.S.) and often hold additional degrees in specific subject …

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The Forgotten Influenza of 1918: When a Strong Immune System Becomes a Weakness

September 23, 2009
The Forgotten Influenza of 1918: When a Strong Immune System Becomes a Weakness

Emily Breidbart

Faculty peer reviewed

As the threat of the swine flu surfaced in early 2009, doctors and the media referenced the influenza of 1918. Also known as the Spanish flu, this pandemic spread to nearly every part of the world and killed more humans than any other disease in a similar period in known history. According to an epidemiological study done in 2002, this unusually virulent strain of influenza A, subtype H1N1, is said to have killed approximately 50 million people worldwide. At least …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

September 21, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Carolyn Bevan MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

With health care spending increasing at an unsustainable rate while an estimated 46 million Americans live without insurance , the urgent need for healthcare reform in the US is clear. Much less obvious, however, is how to go about it. At the beginning of the month, President Obama addressed Congress in a political call to arms, emphasizing that Americans must come together to address this important issue. This week, many of the major medical journals weighed in on the …

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Diseases 2.0: Rheumatoid Arthritis

September 18, 2009
Diseases 2.0: Rheumatoid Arthritis

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Rachana Jani MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Rheumatoid arthritis is a well-recognized but enigmatic disease afflicting the lives of thousands of individuals each year. The mysterious nature of RA has become increasingly uncovered as research has mapped various pathways of cytokine production and interleukin activation. However, in practice, we use clinical criteria to diagnose RA and evaluate the effectiveness of these new therapies.Though soon to be updated, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) …

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The Utility of GlycoMark ™: 1,5 Anhydroglucitol as a Marker for Glycemic Control

September 16, 2009
The Utility of GlycoMark ™: 1,5 Anhydroglucitol as a Marker for Glycemic Control

David R. Friedmann MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hemoglobin A1 (Hb A1c) is the standard method for monitoring diabetic patients’ long-term glycemic control by indicating average blood glucose levels over a period of two months, or half of the average life span of red blood cells. A new biochemical marker GlycoMarkTM is a test that measures serum levels of 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), a monosaccharide derived from ingestion of food, slightly different in structure from glucose. The test has been available in Japan since the early 1990s but …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

September 14, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Michael Ford MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Last spring, The New York Times published a series of articles that examined the status of “the War on Cancer,” initiated some 40 years ago by then president Richard Nixon. The halting pace of this war was made more poignant with the recent death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, who had championed the effort from its inception. Certainly, much has been learned about cancer in the intervening decades, but while other illnesses saw dramatic improvement in outcome (since 1950, …

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