Dermatology

Confocal Microscopy To Noninvasively Detect Skin Cancer: An Emerging Technology To Avoid Unnecessary Skin Biopsy

September 6, 2013
Confocal Microscopy To Noninvasively Detect Skin Cancer: An Emerging Technology To Avoid Unnecessary Skin Biopsy

By Brian Park

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer worldwide. In the United States, the incidence is rising, with over two million people diagnosed each year . More cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year than breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancer combined. The lifetime risk of developing skin cancer is estimated to be 20% . Although nonmelanoma skin cancer is rarely fatal and associated with a very low mortality rate, melanoma can be highly fatal. Approximately 76,000…

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If I Eat Candy and Fatty Foods, Will I Get Acne?

June 3, 2011
If I Eat Candy and Fatty Foods, Will I Get Acne?

By Timothy Wu, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 17-year-old female comes into the clinic for an annual health checkup.  During the visit she reveals that she has been dealing with acne so severe that she is often embarrassed to go to school.  She states that her diet often consists of lots of candy, fast food, and soft drinks.  She asks, “Am I getting acne because of what I eat?”

Introduction

Acne is…

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Educating Patients About Sun Exposure

March 23, 2011
Educating Patients About Sun Exposure

By Courtney Maxey

Faculty Peer Reviewed

At this point it seems that the general public is aware of the relationship between exposure to the sun and skin cancer. It is troubling, however, that our culture still considers a dark tan to be “healthy” despite the World Health Organization’s classification of ultraviolet light emitted from tanning devices as a human carcinogen, based on observational studies that show a 75% increase in cutaneous melanoma in people using tanning devices before age…

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Mystery Quiz- The Answer

November 13, 2010
Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Dana Clutter, MD

Edited by Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

Faculty peer reviewed

The answer to the mystery quiz is bacillary angiomatosis (BA). BA is a disease that most frequently affects individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and typically presents with multiple cutaneous papules and nodules. Visceral manifestations also occur and can involve the bone, lungs, lymph nodes, spleen, liver (termed peliosis hepatis) and the central nervous system.(1) Since the relatively…

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Mystery Quiz

November 10, 2010
Mystery Quiz

Dana Clutter, MD

Edited by Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

A 25 year old woman infected with HIV presents to an HIV/AIDS clinic in Kampala, Uganda, for evaluation of cutaneous lesions on her face, arms and back. Aside from the disfiguring nature of her lesions, she reports being in her usual state of health. She denies any constitutional symptoms and all of her vital signs are stable. Her current CD4+ T cell count is 1 cell/cmm and she has…

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How Do You Advise the Balding Patient?

January 13, 2010
How Do You Advise the Balding Patient?

Sagar Mungekar

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The incidence of male pattern hair loss can reach almost 100% in some ethnic groups.1, 2 While treatment of the condition is usually deferred to dermatologists, it is often the primary care physician (PCP) who is first approached for advice. Several medical and surgical treatments exist for male pattern hair loss. Herbal supplements and products on infomercials make cursory non-FDA-approved claims of hair growth. Minoxidil, once developed for hypertension, is available over the counter…

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Wheal and Flare: Chronic Urticaria Revisited

September 9, 2009
Wheal and Flare: Chronic Urticaria Revisited

Erin Ducharme MD

Faculty peer reviewed by Rardi Feigenbaum MD

Urticaria is a common cutaneous disorder characterized by transient edematous plaques resulting from acute dermal edema and surrounding erythema. Roughly 20% of the general population will manifest urticaria at some point in their lives, qualifying it as a condition caregivers should be able to recognize and treat. When the unsightly wheal and flare reaction combined with periods of intense pruritis persists for greater than six weeks without an identifiable causative…

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Grand Rounds: “Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis”

June 5, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis”

Commentary by Jatin Roper MD, PGY-3

Medical Grand Rounds today was presented last week by Dr. Shawn Cowper, Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine. Grand Rounds began with the presentation of a case from Tisch Hospital:

A 46 year old female with a history of end-stage renal disease secondary to diffuse-proliferative glomerulonephritis on hemodialysis, systemic lupus erythematosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and IVC thrombosis presents to a dermatology consultant for progressive hardness, tightness, and tenderness…

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Links: Dermis.net-An Online Dermatology Atlas

January 5, 2007
Links: Dermis.net-An Online Dermatology Atlas

The best online dermatology atlas I have come across is dermIS.net.  The site originates from Germany and includes an excellent, easily searchable database with terrific pictures and clinical information. The most useful feature of the site however is the differential diagnosis list which appears next to the pictures that are displayed.  So if you have an educated guess what the rash you're looking at is, then you can easily review similar rashes and quickly compare and contrast them to your original diagnosis. Then you can make the fancy diagnosis, sound smart…

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Breaking News: FDA Advises Caution with Gadolinium Based Contrast

December 27, 2006
Breaking News: FDA Advises Caution with Gadolinium Based Contrast

Commentary By: Minisha Sood PGY-3

The FDA has received reports of 90 patients with moderate to end-stage kidney disease who have undergone MRI or MRA with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and subsequently developed a new disease known as Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF).

Scientists first identified NSF, also known as Nephrogenic Fibrosing Dermopathy (NFD), in 1997 and its cause has not yet been identified.  There have been approximately 200 reports of NSF/NFD only in people with kidney disease.  Neither the duration of kidney disease nor its…

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What Is Sezary Syndrome?

December 11, 2006
What Is Sezary Syndrome?

Morning Report-Tisch Hospital

Case Presentation: 83 year old with a past medical history of hypertension noted erytematous plaques with scale about 1 year ago.  The rash was associated with diffuse pruritis at that time.  The patient subsequently underwent several inconclusive biopsies.  She was eventially diagnosed with mycosis fungoides and treated with UV therapy.  Her rash progressed to a diffuse pruritic erythema covering the vast majority of her body, including palms and soles.  (erythroderma).  She was noted to have Sezary cells on peripheral smear and diagnosed…

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