Systems

The Persistent HIV Crisis: HIV Prevalence Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)

February 3, 2016
The Persistent HIV Crisis: HIV Prevalence Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)

By Ofole Mgbako, MD

Peer Reviewed

In July 2010, the much-anticipated “National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States” was released to the public. In its introduction, the president declared, “Our Nation is at a crossroads…unless we take bold actions, we face a new era of rising infections, greater challenges in serving people living with HIV, and higher health care costs” . Indeed, the incidence of HIV infection in the U.S. has fallen dramatically over the last few decades, from initially 130,000 new infections annually in …

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Hirudotherapy: An Ugly Means of Avoiding Uglier Outcomes

January 22, 2016
Hirudotherapy: An Ugly Means of Avoiding Uglier Outcomes

By Jonathan Bekisz

Peer Reviewed

“Do you want to see something gross? Go into the soiled utility room and check out what’s in the jar.” Never one to pass on the opportunity to “see something gross,” I poked my head in and examined the tiny glass jar that sat on the counter. Living up to its billing, within the container sat about a half dozen leeches. Contrary to my assumption that any role these segmented worms had in the field of medicine went away with …

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Is It Time to Reconsider Who Should Get Metformin?

December 11, 2015
Is It Time to Reconsider Who Should Get Metformin?

By Lauren Strazzulla

Current FDA guidelines for the use of metformin stipulate that it not be prescribed to those with an elevated creatinine (at or above 1.5 mg/dL for men and 1.4 mg/dL for women). It is also contraindicated in patients with heart failure requiring pharmacologic treatment, and people over age 80, unless their creatinine demonstrates that renal function is not reduced. These guidelines are in place to prevent lactic acidosis, an understandably feared complication of metformin. However, metformin is, by consensus, the initial drug …

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Are We Overusing Proton Pump Inhibitors?

November 13, 2015
Are We Overusing Proton Pump Inhibitors?

By Shimwoo Lee
Peer Reviewed
Case: A 31-year-old man with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes was hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia. His home medications included esomeprazole. When asked why he was receiving this medication, the patient said it was first started during his prior hospitalization for “ulcer prevention” eight months ago and that he had continued to take it since. He denied any history of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Esomeprazole was tapered off during this admission. When being discharged after successful treatment of his pneumonia, he was …

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HDL Quantity, Necessary But Not Sufficient For Cardioprotection

September 30, 2015
HDL Quantity, Necessary But Not Sufficient For Cardioprotection

By Kerrilynn Carney, MD

Peer Reviewed

Coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of death globally despite the use of statin therapy. Although major statin studies suggest an average 31% reduction in relative risk of coronary events, a residual risk of 69% remains to be addressed. (1) The search for a medical therapy to ameliorate residual risk has become the holy grail of cardiologists and pharmaceutical companies alike. While high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (HDL) independently predict cardiovascular disease risk, interventions to raise circulating HDL levels …

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The Great Marijuana Debate – Effects on Psychosis and Cognition

August 13, 2015
The Great Marijuana Debate – Effects on Psychosis and Cognition

By Kristina Cieslak, MD

Peer Reviewed 

The heavily debated gradual decriminalization and legalization of marijuana will likely result in easier access for all ages. An informed debate has been stymied, however, by a lack of prospective data examining the various long-term effects of marijuana use on the brain, particularly among adolescents who use it heavily. This year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) initiated the “National Longitudinal Study of the Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Substance Use.” This study will follow a large cohort of children …

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The Role of Fish Oil in Arrhythmia Prevention

July 29, 2015
The Role of Fish Oil in Arrhythmia Prevention

By Steven Bolger

Peer Reviewed

Omega-3 fatty acids were first identified as a potential agent to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease through several epidemiologic studies of the Greenlandic Inuit in the 1970s suggesting that high consumption of fish oil was associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease . Fish oil contains two omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that have been shown to be beneficial in treating hypertriglyceridemia and in the secondary prevention of cardiac events .

The GISSI-Prevenzione trial, …

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UV Nail Lamps and Cancer: A Correlation?

July 24, 2015
UV Nail Lamps and Cancer: A Correlation?

By Jennifer Ng, MD

Peer Reviewed 

Beauty and suffering are often thought to be intertwined.  It is hard to have your cake and eat it too.  In the quest for beauty, women (and men) have subjected themselves to toxic and potentially deadly practices, such as applying lead-based cosmetics to whiten their faces historically , or more recently, going to tanning beds and/or laying out in the sun for prolonged periods to get a “healthy glow.”  As we have become increasingly health-conscious and vigilant, more and …

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