Systems

Is There Evidence to Support a Vegetarian Diet in Common Chronic Diseases?

June 20, 2013
Is There Evidence to Support a Vegetarian Diet in Common Chronic Diseases?

By Christopher Graffeo

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In the age of prevention, primary care is more empowered than ever to educate patients on reducing their risk for common chronic diseases by promoting behavior modifications early in the natural history. In the clinic, this means a focus on hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes—risk factors that play synergistic roles in causing a wide array of diseases with tremendous morbidity and mortality. Given the large number of risk factors that co-exist for so many patients, astute clinicians are aiming for…

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Should I Add Sugar or Splenda to My Coffee?

June 6, 2013
Should I Add Sugar or Splenda to My Coffee?

By Reda Issa

Faculty Peer Reviewed

As a medical student, I adjusted to waking up at 6 AM every day – with the help of coffee, of course. Living in New York City and its fast-paced routine requires that extra kick those beans provide. So, should I add sugar or Splenda to my coffee? Half a century ago this question did not exist, but obesity was not a word in the Merriam-Webster then. Today, we have to think more carefully.

Non-sucrose based sweeteners can be…

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Too Much of a Good Thing: The Evidence Behind the Need for a Bisphosphonate Holiday

May 9, 2013
Too Much of a Good Thing: The Evidence Behind the Need for a Bisphosphonate Holiday

By Jenna Piccininni

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Bisphosphonates are a relatively new medication having only been approved to treat osteoporosis in the US since 1995 . In addition, large placebo controlled trials have, at most, 10 years of follow-up data. Thus, there are still questions regarding the long-term use of these agents. There are a few well-established side effects of bisphosphonates including rare osteonecrosis of the jaw and more common esophageal irritation. However, several more recent case reports suggest a correlation between prolonged bisphosphonate use and…

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Is Personalized Medicine Really the Cure? Looking Through the Lens of Breast Cancer

May 3, 2013
Is Personalized Medicine Really the Cure?  Looking Through the Lens of Breast Cancer

By Jessica Billig

Faculty Peer Reviewed 

Although millions of dollars are spent towards cancer research every year, progress toward a cure is less than ideal. Last year the New York Times posted a piece about the burgeoning improvements on the genomic front that could lead to a new approach to cancer treatment. “The promise is that low-cost gene sequencing will lead to a new era of personalized medicine, yielding new approaches for treating cancers and other serious diseases” . Through genomic technology, physicians will be able…

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Preserving Residual Renal Function

May 1, 2013
Preserving Residual Renal Function

By Jerome Lowenstein,  MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Two questions that often arise concerning the administration of radio-contrast in patients with advanced renal disease, receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, reveal what appear to be widespread and important misconceptions.

The first misconception is that in end-stage renal disease, glomerular filtration is absent or minimal and the removal of wastes (“uremic toxins”) is accomplished only by peritoneal or hemodialysis Most patients who reach the advanced stages of renal disease requiring hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis are not oliguric and…

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In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

April 17, 2013
In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

By David G. Rosenthal and Robert Gianotti, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 33-year-old man comes to your clinic complaining of worsening acne over the last 6 months. You note a significant increase in both BMI and bicep circumference. After several minutes of denial, he reveals that he has been using both injectable and oral anabolic steroids. He receives these drugs from a local supplier and via the Internet. He confides that his libido has dramatically increased and he feels increasingly pressured at work, describing…

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Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

April 12, 2013
Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

By Tyler R. McClintock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“Red Meat Kills.” “Red Meat a Ticket to Early Grave.” “A Hot Dog a Day Raises Risk of Dying.” Such were the headlines circulating in popular press last year when the Annals of Internal Medicine released details of an upcoming article out of Frank Hu’s research group at the Harvard School of Public Health . Analyzing long-term prospective data from two large cohort studies, researchers found that individuals who ate a serving of unprocessed red meat each day…

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The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

April 4, 2013
The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

By Michael Crist

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Until recently, little thought was given to the important role played by the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum in glucose homeostasis. The involvement of the gut in glucose regulation is mediated by the enteroinsular axis, which refers to the neural and hormonal signaling pathways that connect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with pancreatic beta cells. These pathways are largely responsible for the increase in insulin that occurs during the postprandial period. In 1964 McIntyre and colleagues first reported the phenomenon…

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White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

March 20, 2013
White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

By Lauren Foster

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hypertension is a pervasive chronic disease affecting approximately 65 million adults in the United States, and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality . Antihypertensives are widely prescribed due to their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, the phenomenon of the “white coat effect” may be a complicating factor in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive patients. It is well established that a considerable number of people experience an elevation of their…

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Anal cancer screening – A case for screening anal paps

January 24, 2013
Anal cancer screening – A case for screening anal paps

By Nelson Sanchez, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case:

A 56 year-old homosexual male presents to your clinic to ask whether or not he should have an anal Pap smear. The patient is HIV positive, has been on HAART for five years, and has no history of opportunistic infections. He denies any anal pain, bleeding or masses.

While efforts to improve knowledge about colorectal cancer in various communities continues to grow, awareness of and misconceptions about anal cancer remain. Over the past couple of years…

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Promising New Hepatitis C Medications Raise Hopes, Questions

January 17, 2013
Promising New Hepatitis C Medications Raise Hopes, Questions

By Carl M. Gay, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 61-year old man with a history of chronic genotype 1b hepatitis C virus infection of unknown duration arrives for his semiannual appointment in the Hepatology Clinic. The patient has previously been offered treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, which he has declined on the basis of potential side effects and poor reported efficacy. He states that he has read that new treatment options for hepatitis C have recently become available…

Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first…

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Mystery Quiz-The Answer

January 10, 2013
Mystery Quiz-The Answer

Elizabeth Mulaikal MD, Vivian Hayashi MD, Robert Smith MD

The answer to the mystery quiz is pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection. The patient’s clinical presentation of fevers and night sweats suggested an infectious process or B symptoms due to lymphoma. The initial chest radiograph (image 1) demonstrated a left hilar mass which was noted to be larger on a subsequent chest radiograph (images 2 and 4)) 1 month later. This increase in size over a short duration again suggested an infectious etiology. Importantly and a key…

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