FROM THE ARCHIVES: Does Culturing the Catheter Tip Change Patient Outcomes?

September 26, 2014
FROM THE ARCHIVES: Does Culturing the Catheter Tip Change Patient Outcomes?

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated November 17, 2011

By Todd Cutler, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

An 82-year-old man is admitted to the intensive care unit with fevers, hypoxic respiratory failure and hypotension. He is intubated and resuscitated with intravenous fluids. A central venous catheter is placed via the internal jugular vein. A chest x-ray showed a right lower lobe infiltrate and he is treated empirically with antibiotics for pneumonia. Blood cultures grow out S. pneumoniae. After four days he is successfully extubated.…

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Are Health Care Providers PrEPared?

September 24, 2014
Are Health Care Providers PrEPared?

By Nathan King

Faculty Reviewed

Doctors are known to be some of the worst patients, and from personal experience I predict that medical students are not too far behind. That’s why when I finally found the time to take a proactive step in maintaining my good health, the last thing I hoped to run into were barriers, but that’s exactly what I hit. To my surprise, it was not at the hands of insurance companies, overbooked doctors, or the general bureaucracy of the medical system;…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

September 22, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Caroline Srisarajivakul, MD

Peer Reviewed

In a historic election marked by a 97% voter registration rate, Scotland elected to remain a part of the United Kingdom with a 55% majority; while promises of increased power for Scottish lawmakers were promised by the British government, supporters of Scottish independence remain skeptical that the Westminster parliamentary parties will be able to come to a resolution.

Medical news this week included a study looking at the differences between anticoagulation treatments for acute venous thromboembolism (VTE), investigations into…

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To Inject, or Not to Inject: Using the Pneumococcal Vaccinations Effectively

September 19, 2014
To Inject, or Not to Inject: Using the Pneumococcal Vaccinations Effectively

By Luke O’Donnell, MD

Peer reviewed

Once formidable diseases, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis are all now considered “bread-and-butter” internal medicine. Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the major pathogens in these processes, causing 500,000 cases of pneumonia, 50,000 cases of bacteremia, and 3,000 cases of bacterial meningitis in the United States annually, with case fatality rates of 5-7%, 20%, and 30%, respectively .

Efforts to vaccinate against this gram-positive diplococcus started in mining sites near Johannesburg, South Africa around the turn of the last century…

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From the Bellevue Wards: Wellens’ Syndrome Revisited

September 18, 2014
From the Bellevue Wards: Wellens’ Syndrome Revisited

By Matthew Shou Lun Lee, MD

Peer Reviewed

Clinical Questions

-How common are elevated cardiac enzymes during Wellens’ syndrome?

-Can the EKG changes in Wellens’ syndrome be found with other causes?

Background

This post represents a follow-up to the 2009 article in Clinical Correlations by Dr. Erin Ducharme .

Wellens’ syndrome refers to a distinctive combination of clinical and EKG findings in unstable angina associated with high-grade lesions of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) . Initially described in 1982, the criteria has undergone…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

September 16, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Caroline Srisarajivakul, MD

Peer Reviewed

The invisible silhouettes of the Twin Towers loomed large in the minds of many New Yorkers last week as we marked the 13th anniversary of September 11th, 2001, while President Obama rallied the United States’ allies in the Middle East to unite against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria prior to the terror group’s third videotaped beheading, this time of Briton David Haines. Meanwhile, in Western Africa, Ebola Virus Disease continues to ravage populations that are ill-equipped to…

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Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

September 11, 2014
Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 9, 2011

By Jessie Yu

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 21-year-old female college student presents to clinic after one day of dysuria and increased frequency. You diagnose her with a recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and as you hand her a prescription for empiric antibiotic treatment, she asks you if drinking cranberry juice will prevent these in the future…

Drinking cranberry juice to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been a traditional folk remedy for…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

September 9, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Vaughan Tuohy, MD

Peer Reviewed

In sports news this week, the Seahawks crushed the Packers, 36-16, in the NFL season opener as Aaron Rodgers “played scared” against the Seahawks defense led by Richard Sherman, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. In actual news, the U.S. military continued airstrikes against ISIS in Iraq and clashes between Ukrainian troops and pro-Russian militants continued in Eastern Ukraine despite a ceasefire agreement. A federal judge ruled that BP should be fined $18 billion for “profit-driven decisions and willful…

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