Measles in 2016

July 20, 2016
Measles in 2016

By Chio Yokose, MD

Peer Reviewed

On March 13, 2013, a young traveler returned home from London to our neighboring borough of Brooklyn, NY. Among this individual’s possessions was an active measles infection, one which subsequently led to one of the largest outbreaks of measles in the United States since 1996 .  The individual was an intentionally unvaccinated 17-year-old member of the Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn.  A total of 58 cases were eventually identified, and all of them were in the Brooklyn Orthodox Jewish …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

July 18, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Dana Zalkin, MD 

Peer Reviewed

This week the world witnessed a deadly attack in France, a tumultuous coup attempt in Turkey, and the announcement of the Trump-Pence GOP presidential ticket. As crowds gathered to watch the Bastille Day fireworks display in Nice, France, a massacre ensued when a truck plowed through the crowd killing 84 individuals .  While the world attempted to come to terms with what had occurred in France, the presumptive US Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump, officially announced his running mate …

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More Than A Medical Note

July 15, 2016
More Than A Medical Note

By Alicia Cowley, MD

Ms. R had been admitted late the previous night so I expected that I would have to gently nudge her from her sleep. So as I peeked around the curtain separating her bed from her roommate’s, I was surprised to find a woman alert and freshly bathed. She had assembled a makeshift vanity with a mirror and a small cosmetics pouch that she had propped conspicuously atop her overbed table.

She was about to apply some lipstick when she noticed me. …

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Does Stress Cause Stress Ulcers? The Etiology and Pathophysiology of Stress Ulcers

July 14, 2016
Does Stress Cause Stress Ulcers? The Etiology and Pathophysiology of Stress Ulcers

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 22, 2012

Sara-Megumi Naylor, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

When Warren and Marshall were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2005 for their work on Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease , a long-standing controversy concerning the major cause of peptic ulcers was settled. They are not due to the reasons—spicy food, excessive coffee consumption, poor sleep, a stressful lifestyle—that we have heard from relatives and perhaps believed over the years. It is now …

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Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

July 13, 2016
Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

By Tyler Litton, MD

Peer Reviewed

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is relatively rare but incidence has increased in the US over the past 40 years. Tonsillar cancer is the most common type of OPSCC followed by base of tongue cancer, which together account for 90% of all OPSCCs. The incidence of both tonsillar and base of tongue cancers individually have also increased in the US. OPSCC is more common in men than women and smoking and alcohol are well known risk factors for …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

July 11, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Amar Parikh, MD

Peer Reviewed

Just days after the United States celebrated its 240th birthday, the nation was devastated by the tragic deaths of two young black men and five Dallas police officers amidst the country’s ongoing struggle over race relations. Alton Sterling was shot to death in Baton Rouge, Louisiana during an encounter with two police officers, while Philando Castile was killed in Falcon Heights, Minnesota during a routine stop for a broken taillight. The grisly footage of both their deaths was widely …

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From the Archives: Myth vs. Reality: The July Effect

July 7, 2016
From the Archives: Myth vs. Reality: The July Effect

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 12, 2012

By Mark Adelman, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Another July 1st has come and gone, marking the yearly transition in US graduate medical education of interns to junior residents, junior residents to senior residents, and senior residents to fellows. With this annual mid-summer mass influx of nearly 37,000 interns and other trainees taking on new clinical responsibilities, learning to use different electronic medical record systems and navigating the other idiosyncrasies of unfamiliar institutions, one …

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Stroke 2.0: Novel methods of Detection, Selection and Intervention in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

June 29, 2016
Stroke 2.0: Novel methods of Detection, Selection and Intervention in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

By David Valentine, MD

Peer Reviewed

Stroke is among the costliest disorders in the world for both individuals and society. Every hour of an evolving stroke kills 120 million neurons, destroys 830 billion synapses and degrades 714 kilometers of myelinated fibers, aging the brain by 3.6 years in those 60 minutes1. It is the leading cause of adult disability in the USA, currently costing $70 billion a year2 with $2.2 trillion more projected over the next forty years3. The global burden is even higher.

Despite …

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