The Quest for the HIV Vaccine: Are We Closer Than We Think?

January 20, 2016
The Quest for the HIV Vaccine: Are We Closer Than We Think?

By Amar Parikh, MD 

Peer Reviewed

Amidst the global panic over the recent Ebola outbreak, another well-known pathogen that has been devastating the world for decades continues to smolder—the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2013 there were 35 million people worldwide living with HIV, 2.1 million of who were newly infected that year . HIV/AIDS has claimed the lives of nearly 40 million people to date, with 1.5 million people dying from AIDS in 2013 alone. Although highly …

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Lies My Patients Told Me: “I Take My Medications Every Day.”

January 15, 2016
Lies My Patients Told Me: “I Take My Medications Every Day.”

By Rebecca Sussman

Peer Reviewed

Reviewing medical evidence has become such a habit that sometimes it feels almost impossible to think independently. I’ve always been a top-down thinker; I go with my gut instinct, and then look for the evidence to support my assessment.

The problem is that very often it feels like what patients need most is not the precision of a particular etiology or the selection of a medication that is perfectly and precisely tailored to their condition and comorbidities; what they need …

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Myth or Reality: Are Shellfish Allergies Related to Contrast Reactions?

January 13, 2016
Myth or Reality: Are Shellfish Allergies Related to Contrast Reactions?

By Ian Fagan, MD

Peer Reviewed

I was recently vacationing on a cruise ship. As anybody who regularly cruises most certainly knows, you make your money back not in the casino, but rather on lobster night—a meal consisting of endless portions of delicious, succulent lobster tail.

A table mate of mine did not order the lobster. When asked why, she shared an interesting tale: After 40 years of eating shellfish as she pleased, she was found to be “allergic to iodine” and was subsequently warned …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

January 11, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Matthew McNeill, MD

Peer Reviewed

The holidays have ended, the trees and tinsel have been taken down, and winter has officially arrived in New York City. Unseasonably warm weather (from the second warmest year in history ]) up to this point has kept the influenza virus as a sporadically diagnosed condition in New York and much of the United States. The advent of cooler air, lower humidity, enclosed spaces, runny noses, and decreased Vitamin D are sure to change that in coming weeks ].…

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A Clinical Correlations Winter (Summer?) Break

December 24, 2015
A Clinical Correlations Winter (Summer?) Break

While reveling in the balmy weather in New York, we wanted to take this opportunity to wish everyone Happy Holidays and a wonderful New Year.  Clinical Correlations will be on a brief hiatus and will resume publishing on 1/11/16.  Stay warm…seriously.…

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

December 23, 2015
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By Pooja Gala, MD

Last week, world leaders convened in Paris to sign a landmark climate deal. 186 countries submitted plans to reduce greenhouse gas pollution to “hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels” to avoid catastrophic storms, rising sea levels, and droughts . Across the ocean, Janet Yellen announced an increase in federal interest rates for the first time in 7 years signaling the Fed’s confidence in the US economy . Taking a break …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

December 16, 2015
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By David Pineles, MD

Peer Reviewed 

On Sunday, December 6th, President Barack Obama addressed the nation from the Oval Office following the horrific mass shooting in San Bernardino, California which left 14 people dead and the recent discovery that the perpetrators were indeed radicalized terrorists . In his speech, the president discussed our nation’s fight against terrorism since 9/11 and the steps our country is taking to fight the current threat of ISIS . In other news, Donald Trump continues his surprising run for presidency …

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Is It Time to Reconsider Who Should Get Metformin?

December 11, 2015
Is It Time to Reconsider Who Should Get Metformin?

By Lauren Strazzulla

Current FDA guidelines for the use of metformin stipulate that it not be prescribed to those with an elevated creatinine (at or above 1.5 mg/dL for men and 1.4 mg/dL for women). It is also contraindicated in patients with heart failure requiring pharmacologic treatment, and people over age 80, unless their creatinine demonstrates that renal function is not reduced. These guidelines are in place to prevent lactic acidosis, an understandably feared complication of metformin. However, metformin is, by consensus, the initial drug …

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