Neoplastic Fever: Pathophysiology, Clinical Features, And Diagnostic Assessment

August 13, 2014
Neoplastic Fever: Pathophysiology, Clinical Features, And Diagnostic Assessment

By David Kudlowitz, MD

Peer Reviewed

Neoplastic fever (aka tumor fever) is a challenging yet essential clinical diagnosis. In fevers of unknown origin, studies estimate that the incidence of neoplastic fever is anywhere from 7 to 31% . In the febrile patient with malignancy, tumor fever is the most common cause of non-infectious pyrexia (41%) . While leukemia, lymphoma, sarcoma, atrial myxoma, renal cell carcinoma, and liver metastases are the most common culprits, neoplastic fever has been reported in several other cancer types…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

August 11, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Kerrilynn Carney, MD

Peer Reviewed

In global news this week, shots resume as the ceasefire expires between Israel and Hamas. Strikes in Gaza were quickly followed by those in Iraq, where President Obama authorized military strikes on Islamic state militants advancing toward the US consulate and military personnel residing in the city of Irbil. A US journalist was arrested in Iran for unknown reason and the struggle to contain Ebola marches on. Among the wave of violence and contagion abroad, at home Dr. Kent…

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Chimeras Could Bridge the Gap Between Treatment and Cure Or Are They Your Silent and Deadly Twin?

August 8, 2014
Chimeras Could Bridge the Gap Between Treatment and Cure Or Are They Your Silent and Deadly Twin?

By Pritha Subramanyam

Peer Reviewed

Mrs. CS is a 66-year-old Indian female who presents for a cardiology follow-up. The patient has a history of mitral regurgitation secondary to rheumatic fever she experienced as a child. As a teenager, her condition was diagnosed when she frequently became short of breath while playing sports in school. She was in good health until 24 years ago, when an acute episode of dyspnea while climbing stairs sent her to the emergency room. Her native mitral valve was found to…

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From The Archives – The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

August 7, 2014
From The Archives – The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 2, 2011

By Nicholas Mark, MD & Sarah Buckley, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Background

Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, emperor of Rome (117-138 CE), traveler, warrior, and lover of all things Greek, fell ill at the age of 60. He developed progressive edema and episodic epistaxis, fell into a depression soothed by rich food and drink, and succumbed to death within 2 years. The exact cause of Hadrian’s death–whether by heart failure, glomerulonephritis, or…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

August 5, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Tamar Schiff, MD

Peer Reviewed

Infectious diseases remain at the forefront of news reports this week, as the largest Ebola outbreak on record continues. As of July 27th, the WHO reported greater than 1300 new cases and a devastating 729 deaths in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone since March of this year . This past weekend saw the U.S. arrival of the first of two American aid workers who were infected with the virus while working in a hospital in Liberia . This patient…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

July 29, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Grace Huang, MD

Peer Reviewed

Many of us became familiar with the Ebola virus after reading Richard Preston’s fictional thriller, The Hot Zone. However, in recent months, fiction has turned to reality in West Africa, as one of the largest reported outbreaks of the virus continues to spread, with 1,093 cases and 660 deaths to date across three, now possibly four, countries. As efforts continue to contain the virus as quickly as possible, we turn to a few other issues in medicine which, while…

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If You Could Give One Piece Of Advice To A Young Doctor…

July 25, 2014
If You Could Give One Piece Of Advice To A Young Doctor…

By Ali Marisa Mendelson, MD

Peer Reviewed

It was late when I left the call room on my last day as an intern in the step-down unit, and I hesitated before entering the stairwell. I considered turning instead towards the elevators, which would take me swiftly down seventeen floors, a world away from the sickness and disease we had spent the day battling. Instead, I took a detour to say good-bye to a patient I had met earlier in the month. I felt somewhat embarrassed…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

July 21, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Caroline A. Nelson, MD

Peer Reviewed

New legislation signed by Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has opened the door for medical school graduates to treat patients in underserved primary care settings without residency training or passing Step 3 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination. After 30 days of supervision by a collaborating physician, the law would permit these new “Assistant Physicians” to treat patients with only indirect supervision as far as 50 miles away. The Missouri State Medical Association helped draft the law to…

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