Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

November 4, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Benjamin Geisler, MD MPH

Peer reviewed

With the first Ebola patient being treated in the New York City area in one of our own training institutions, the viral disease is, understandably, on all our minds. Now a week and a half ago, Bellevue’s atrium was the setting for a press conference that featured the mayor, the city’s health commissioner, and the governor. Since then, the governors of New York, New Jersey, and Maine have instituted a quarantine for returning health care workers from the…

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Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

October 20, 2014
Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

By Anish Parikh, MD

Peer Reviewed

This week, the Ebola virus outbreak continues to dominate the news both here and abroad. The number of newly-diagnosed patients in West Africa continues to rise, particularly in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, while Nigeria and Senegal have gone nearly four weeks without any new cases. International aid workers infected with Ebola continue to be transported out of affected areas back to their home countries, however as a consequence of this, new cases are now starting to arise…

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Falls in Older Adults—Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention

October 15, 2014
Falls in Older Adults—Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention

By Joseph Plaksin

Peer Reviewed

Falls are a major health problem for older adults. Various reviews and meta-analyses have estimated that 30% of people over age 65 and 50% of people over age 85 who live in the community will fall at least once. The prevalence of falls is even higher in long-term care facilities, occurring in more than 50% of people over age 65 . Fall-related injuries occur in 10-40% of falls and can range from minor bruises or lacerations to…

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It Was Almost Called the Cylinder (& Other Who-Knew Facts about the Stethoscope)

October 10, 2014
It Was Almost Called the Cylinder (& Other Who-Knew Facts about the Stethoscope)

By Cindy Fang, MD

Peer Reviewed

“A wonderful instrument…is now in complete vogue in Paris…It is quite a fashion, if a person complains of cough, to have recourse to the miraculous tube which however cannot effect a cure but should you unfortunately perceive in the countenance of the doctor that he fancies certain symptoms exist it is very likely that a nervous person might become seriously indisposed and convert the supposition into reality.” —The London Times, September 19, 1824.

The novel medical instrument…

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From The Archives: Ethical Considerations on the Use of Fear in Public Health Campaigns

October 9, 2014
From The Archives: Ethical Considerations on the Use of Fear in Public Health Campaigns

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 23, 2011

By Ishmeal Bradley, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The goal of public health is to prevent or minimize disease and injury on a population level. How to achieve this end has changed over time, though. In previous decades, communicable diseases posed the greatest health risks. Consequently, public health officials used the tools of isolation, quarantine, and (forced) vaccination to combat these threats. Today, however, the major causes of morbidity and mortality are chronic conditions,…

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Unraveling The Mysteries of Prinzmetal’s Angina: What Is It And How Do We Diagnose It?

October 8, 2014
Unraveling The Mysteries of Prinzmetal’s Angina: What Is It And How Do We Diagnose It?

By Anjali Varma Desai, MD

Peer Reviewed

Mr. Q is a 55-year-old male smoker who presents with recurrent chest pain in the mornings over the past several months. The patient reports being awakened from sleep at approximately 5:00 a.m. each morning with the same diffuse chest “pressure.” The pain typically lasts on the order of minutes, resolves, and then recurs at five-minute intervals in the same fashion for a total duration of two hours. The pain always occurs at rest and is never precipitated…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 6, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Asher Schranz, MD

Peer Reviewed

For the past week, thousands of protesters have flooded Hong Kong streets to demand democracy. The umbrella, initially used by protesters as a shield from pepper spray, has become a central symbol. In the US and abroad, Ebola remained at the top of headlines. A Liberian man visiting Dallas was diagnosed with the disease only after being sent home from an ER several days earlier, potentially exposing up to 100 people. Abroad, Ebola cases continue to balloon, as more…

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Pets Gone Wild: A Review of Animal Attacks

October 1, 2014
Pets Gone Wild: A Review of Animal Attacks

By Thomas Lee

Peer Reviewed

The age-old question that every one of us has been asked at least once: Are you a cat or a dog person? The answer is subjective, as both choices depend on a person’s values, preferences, and lifestyle. A different question, and perhaps a more objective one is: Which would you rather be bitten by? With news stories of pit bull attacks, the common sight of German shepherd police dogs in New York, and the relatively benign appearance of most domesticated…

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