Systems

How Much Do We Know About HDL Cholesterol?

January 29, 2014
How Much Do We Know About HDL Cholesterol?

By Gregory Katz, MD

Peer Reviewed

As levels of HDL cholesterol increase, rates of heart disease go down. It’s this fact that has given HDL its reputation as the “good cholesterol,” serving a crucial role in reverse cholesterol transport. According to our models, HDL ferries cholesterol away from our arteries – where its buildup leads to heart disease and stroke – and back towards our liver, safely out of harm’s way. The epidemiology backs this up: people with higher levels of HDL tend to…

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Can Young Patients Get Diverticular Disease?

January 23, 2014
Can Young Patients Get Diverticular Disease?

By Aaron Smith, MD

Peer Reviewed

Case: A 35 year-old, overweight female presents to the emergency room with five days of left lower quadrant abdominal pain. The pain is 10/10 in severity and accompanied by nausea, bloating, and loss of appetite.

Diverticulosis, the presence of small colonic outpouchings thought to occur secondary to high pressure within the colon, is an extremely common condition in elderly patients. Recent data suggests that up to 50% of people over the age of 60 have colonic diverticula. When…

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From The Archives – The Hangover: Pathophysiology and Treatment of an Alcohol-Induced Hangover

January 16, 2014
From The Archives – The Hangover: Pathophysiology and Treatment of an Alcohol-Induced Hangover

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated May 27, 2011

By Anthony Tolisano

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The sunlight forces its way into your eyes, stabbing at your cortex. Suddenly, a wave of nausea and diarrhea grips your stomach, threatening to evacuate its contents. You rush to the bathroom, tripping over the clothes that speckle your apartment. Your heart pounds inside your chest and your hands shake ever so subtly. Your mind is in a fog and the details of last night’s party are…

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Is it Time to Skip the Gym?

January 15, 2014
Is it Time to Skip the Gym?

By Robert Mocharla, MD

Peer Reviewed

No. Sorry. Despite such reasonable excuses as – “I forgot my iPod”, “It’s pouring rain”, or “Game of Thrones is on” — an exhaustive literature search will not reveal a shred of evidence that you or most of your patients should skip daily exercise. However, a subset of your patients should indeed be skipping workouts regularly. The group referred to consists of endurance athletes (e.g. cyclists, swimmers, long-distance runners, competitive athletes). While this may not describe the majority of…

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The Prevention of Post-ERCP Pancreatitis

January 10, 2014
The Prevention of Post-ERCP Pancreatitis

By Shivani K Patel, MD

Peer reviewed

A 61-year old male with chronic epigastric discomfort presented to the emergency room with severe abdominal pain radiating to his back. He had similarly presented and been hospitalized two weeks prior to this admission at an outside hospital, where he underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of a pancreatic duct stent. His pain initially improved, but quickly recurred after discharge. Admission labs showed only mild leukocytosis with slight elevation in serum lipase. Computed tomography (CT) of the…

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From The Archives: Fast Hearts and Funny Currents, Part 2: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure?

January 9, 2014
From The Archives: Fast Hearts and Funny Currents, Part 2: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated May 25, 2011

By Santosh Vardhana

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Please review Part 1 of this article here.

Mr. M is a 63-year old man with a history of coronary artery disease and systolic congestive heart failure (ejection fraction 32%) on lisinopril, metoprolol, and spironolactone who presents to the Adult Primary Care Center complaining of persistent dyspnea with exertion, two-pillow orthopnea, and severely limited exercise tolerance. His vital signs on presentation are T 98.0˚F, P…

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Who Should We Screen for Hepatitis C: By Risk Or Birth Cohort?

January 8, 2014
Who Should We Screen for Hepatitis C: By Risk Or Birth Cohort?

By Jung-Eun Ha

Peer Reviewed

Over the last few years major changes have occurred in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis C. In 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a rapid finger stick antibody test for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection . The FDA also approved the protease inhibitors telapravir (Incivek; Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, New Jersey) and boceprevir (Victrelis; Merck, Whitehouse Station, New Jersey), for the treatment of genotype 1 hepatitis C . In August…

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Barriers to Translating Evidence into Clinical Care: the Zoster Vaccine

December 13, 2013
Barriers to Translating Evidence into Clinical Care: the Zoster Vaccine

Zachary Elkin

Faculty Peer Reviewed

There are more than a million cases of herpes zoster (HZ) in the US annually . The incidence of HZ, or shingles, has been rising in the US since the 1990s . One third of all people in the US will get HZ, with the highest incidence in people aged 50 to 79 . As a result of the Shingles Prevention Study (SPS), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the Zostavax…

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From The Archives: Fast Hearts and Funny Currents: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure? Part 1

December 12, 2013
From The Archives: Fast Hearts and Funny Currents: Is Tachycardia Part of the Problem in Heart Failure? Part 1

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated May 18, 2011

By Santosh Vardhana

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Mr. M is a 63-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease and systolic CHF (ejection fraction 32%) on lisinopril, metoprolol, and spironolactone who presents to Primary Care Clinic complaining of persistent dyspnea with exertion, two-pillow orthopnea, and severely limited exercise tolerance. His vital signs on presentation are T 98.0º F, BP 122/76, HR 84 bpm. What are his therapeutic options?

A Race Against…

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Concussions and Football By The Numbers

December 6, 2013
Concussions and Football By The Numbers

By Benjamin G. Wu

Peer Reviewed

The news of a large $675 million dollar settlement on concussions has headlined on both the sports news channels and in popular media during this 2013 National Football League (N.F.L.) season . Heralded as a victory mainly for the N.F.L., the settlement not only allows the league to avoid larger amounts in potential liability payments but also the public scrutiny of a discovery phase if a case were to move forward . In the wake of this settlement…

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To Stent or not to Stent? A Review of the Evidence on the Utility of Stenting in Renal Artery Stenosis

November 22, 2013
To Stent or not to Stent? A Review of the Evidence on the Utility of Stenting in Renal Artery Stenosis

By Elizabeth Hammer, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Renovascular hypertension, often caused by renal artery stenosis (RAS) due to atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia, is the most common potentially correctable cause of secondary hypertension. Although only approximately one percent of patients with hypertension have atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD), the prevalence increases to 30-40% in patients with CAD, CHF, and PVD. Screening studies of asymptomatic populations in the United States demonstrate a disease prevalence of 7%, with an annual incidence of 0.5% per year in analyses of…

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From The Archives: The Polymyxins: Why am I using them all the time, and what are they?

November 21, 2013
From The Archives: The Polymyxins: Why am I using them all the time, and what are they?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated December 8, 2010

By Jon-Emile S Kenny

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 65-year-old female with locally advanced rectal cancer is admitted to the ICU, hypotensive and febrile. Her PICC line is removed and blood cultures drawn. Fourty-eight hours later all cultures return ESBL Klebsiella with susceptibility only to polymyxin.

I sat on the venerable call-room couch staring mindlessly at the cluttered, nauseating walls repeating the word ‘polymyxin’ like an endless antimicrobial mantra. What strange dosing it has, and…

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