Systems

Vit-a-minute: Are Supplements Worth It?

July 11, 2014
Vit-a-minute: Are Supplements Worth It?

By Aditya K. Sreenivasan

Peer Reviewed

The Huffington Post recently publicized a large study on the health habits of doctors. The study, a survey done by Medscape with 31,399 participants, revealed that more than half of doctors take some form of dietary supplement. The most common form of supplement taken was a multivitamin . With the way doctors find themselves in constant discussions about “evidence based medicine” these days, we can assume that there are solid data showing that multivitamins are beneficial to long-term health. …

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Inhaled insulin: An Elusive Revolution in Diabetes Management.

June 19, 2014
Inhaled insulin: An Elusive Revolution in Diabetes Management.

By Reed Magleby, MD

Peer Reviewed

For many with type II diabetes, initiation of insulin therapy represents a devastating progression of their disease. Patients who are dependent on insulin require constant blood sugar monitoring, adherence to strict dosing algorithms, and up to 4 self-administered injections every day. According to a 2010 survey of non-insulin adherent diabetic patients, both “injection phobia” and inconvenience were found to be important barriers to initiation of insulin therapy. . In response to these concerns, less invasive administration techniques such as …

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Proton Pump Inhibitors: Acid Suppression with a Nutritional Cost

June 13, 2014
Proton Pump Inhibitors: Acid Suppression with a Nutritional Cost

By Dana Zalkin

Peer Reviewed

In the late 1970s evidence began to emerge that a newly discovered pump, a H+/K+ ATPase in the gastric mucosa, was the final step in the process of acid secretion . With this discovery, further research demonstrated the ability to reduce gastric acid secretion by inhibiting these proton pumps . We now have drugs that do just that: the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Proton pump inhibitors have been used since 1989 to treat acid-related gastrointestinal disorders as well as in …

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Caffeine and the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

June 6, 2014
Caffeine and the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

By Joshua Michael Lader, MD

Peer Reviewed

As physicians, we are frequently asked to weigh-in on dinnertime discussions about topics that, despite their relevance to everyday life, were never formally addressed in our medical training. For example, at a recent family gathering the conversation turned to a 78 year-old uncle who was recently diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. While this uncle had longstanding and likely poorly controlled hypertension, he would also typically drink 4 to 5 cups of coffee between breakfast and lunch. The debate then …

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Are Probiotics Effective In Preventing Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea?

May 30, 2014
Are Probiotics Effective In Preventing Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea?

By Theresa Sumberac, MD

Peer Reviewed

Antibiotic associated diarrhea is a common complication of antibiotic therapy, occurring in 5% to 39% of all patients receiving treatment. Nearly one third of these cases are attributed to the gram –positive spore forming rod, Clostridium difficile . A primary Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) is estimated to add $2871 to $4846 to in hospital costs while a recurrent infection is estimated to cost $13,655 to $18,067 . The emergence of the hyper-virulent NAP1/B1/027 strain of C. difficile together …

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Gay Men, Barebacking and the New Little Blue Pill: The awkward interface of medicine and gay sex.

May 23, 2014
Gay Men, Barebacking and the New Little Blue Pill: The awkward interface of medicine and gay sex.

By Richard E. Greene, MD

Peer Reviewed

In July of 2012, the FDA approved the use of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine (Truvada, a single blue pill) daily as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in men with persistent risk for contracting HIV infection. The idea of PrEP has ignited a firestorm of concern among healthcare providers about how, when and in whom to use PrEP, if at all. Indeed, some believe that PrEP will usher in a new era of drug resistant new infections with HIV, or encourage men on prep …

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From The Archives: Metabolic Syndrome: Fact or Myth?

May 22, 2014
From The Archives: Metabolic Syndrome: Fact or Myth?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 30, 2011

By Vicky Jones, MD

A 40-year-old female presented to her primary care provider with a chief complaint of weight gain over the past year.  She wants to be fully evaluated for any kind of medical disorder that could have caused it.  She has been seen by multiple specialists but no one can give her a “straight diagnosis”.  Their advice is for her to lose weight.  She insists she never had problems with her weight …

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Help Versus Hope: Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer’s Disease

May 21, 2014
Help Versus Hope: Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer’s Disease

By Jonathan Gursky

Peer Reviewed

Approximately 5.2 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) , with this number expected to triple by the year 2050 . Alzheimer’s disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for $100 billion in healthcare expenditures each year . Nevertheless, the most devastating and far-reaching effects of Alzheimer’s disease hit close to home. While those with the disease progressively lose their memory, speech, and independence, it is the caretaker who …

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