Bedside Rounds

The Blue Phone and the Bow-Tie

March 14, 2014
The Blue Phone and the Bow-Tie

By Joseph Zakhar

Peer Reviewed

The Patient:

Fate is the sound of a ringing phone.

I, however, am growing to hate the sound.

I’m strangled by the words, by the rough sheets, the silence as a stranger far away connects us, sitting in some room. There’s a tension, an unsettling sense of doom as I count the doctors’ blinks and wait for the “bonjourno.” I hope the translator – the one who lets me and my doctors talk – is somewhere warm, like Texas.…

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Happy New Year!!

December 31, 2013
Happy New Year!!

As we reach the end of another year, we want to wish all our readers a very happy and healthy New Year. And not to be outdone by every other journal, website, magazine, tv show etc, here is our list of the top 10 articles published on Clinical Correlations in 2013, . … Drumroll please…. In no particular order:

1. Reflections on Hurricane Sandy Jessica Taff, MD

2. In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User David…

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The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

November 2, 2011
The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

Nicholas Mark, MD & Sarah Buckley, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Background

Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, emperor of Rome (117-138 CE), traveler, warrior, and lover of all things Greek, fell ill at the age of 60. He developed progressive edema and episodic epistaxis, fell into a depression soothed by rich food and drink, and succumbed to death within 2 years. The exact cause of Hadrian’s death–whether by heart failure, glomerulonephritis, or even hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia–has been a topic of debate among paleopathologists. It was…

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The Stories My Senses Tell Me

May 20, 2011
The Stories My Senses Tell Me

By David Ellenberg

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Mr. A is a 91 year old male with a history of hypertension and two myocardial infarctions. He presented with shortness of breath and worsening lower extremity swelling and was subsequently admitted to the medicine floor for a CHF exacerbation. While on the floor, he also complained of painful pressure ulcers on his lower buttocks. He was diuresed and given oxygen by nasal cannula during his 48-hour hospital stay, and his ulcers were…

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Tsunamigenesis and Korotkoff’s Sounds

January 26, 2011
Tsunamigenesis and Korotkoff’s Sounds


By Irene Isabel Payad Lim, MD and Michael Ford, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The February 27, 2010 earthquake in Chile measured 8.8 on the Richter scale and displaced nearly 2 million people.  It also threatened to generate tsunamis that were predicted to hit the coasts of Japan, the Philippines, and Hawaii some 7000 miles away.  In this instance, the waves set off by the Chilean earthquake dissipated relatively harmlessly.  On the day after Christmas 2004, however, 14 countries bordering…

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Bedside to Bench: Clubbing Revisited

April 3, 2009
Bedside to Bench: Clubbing Revisited

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Faculty Peer Reviewed 

For an internist, discovering a patient with clubbing is so rewarding since it appeals to the core of our profession, a profession which can often be very similar to that of a detective. The physical finding of clubbing was first described by the ancient Greeks, who recognized it to be a clue to much more.

When a clinician discovers clubbing of the fingers, he must consider that hypoxemia may…

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Grand Rounds: “Evidence-Based Physical Exam”

December 10, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Evidence-Based Physical Exam”

Commentary by Steven Giovannone MD, PGY-2

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before last week’s grand rounds.

This week’s Medical Grand Rounds was given by Dr. Steven McGee from the University of Washington School of Medicine, author of the well-known textbook “Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis”.  His lecture, entitled “Evidence-Based Physical Exam,” targeted the utility of the physical exam in an era of increasingly used alternative diagnostic modalities, especially imaging procedures.

In his talk, Dr. McGee first noted that for several medical conditions, physical diagnosis is still the gold…

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The Rational Clinical Examination: Does This Patient with Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?

March 28, 2008
The Rational Clinical Examination: Does This Patient with Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

The most recent installment in JAMA’s Rational Clinical Exam Series seeks to determine the accuracy of the history, physical exam, radiology and laboratory in making the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in diabetics. This is relevant given its frequency of occurrence and its cost and since the gold standard for diagnosis, namely a bone biopsy and culture, is less than optimal for a variety of reasons.

Less than 10% of the…

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Bedside Rounds Series: Goiter

February 21, 2008
Bedside Rounds Series: Goiter

Commentary by Kristin Remus MD, PGY-3, and Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

The purpose of the physical diagnosis series is to review the origins, pathophysiology and actual techniques of common physical diagnoses. Our hopes are to renew interest in an area of medicine that is occasionally overlooked due to the current use of laboratory values and imaging tests frequently used to make a diagnosis.

Goiter
In the industrialized world, enlarged thyroid, or “goiter”, occurs in 10% of women and…

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Bedside Rounds: How Do You Diagnose and Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

October 3, 2007
Bedside Rounds: How Do You Diagnose and Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most commonly encountered complications of diabetes mellitus. It is seen in up to 20% of diabetics. Patients typically present with neuropathic pain in a “glove and stocking” distribution with the earliest signs in the feet. Night time complaints of “my feet are on fire” are common. Relying on a patient’s complaint of “pain” or “numbness” is inadequate in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy since…

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Bedside Rounds: What is Lasegue’s Sign?

July 10, 2007
Bedside Rounds: What is Lasegue’s Sign?

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

A 66 year old woman with a history of dyslipidemia and remote tobacco use presents with a sudden onset of pain located in her posterior left thigh radiating down her left leg below the knee. The pain began during the course of an upper respiratory illness with a cough. The pain is burning in quality and is bothersome day and night. NSAIDs have been taken and relieve the pain temporarily.…

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Bedside Rounds #1: Why is a pulsus paradoxus not a paradox?

February 1, 2007
Bedside Rounds #1: Why is a pulsus paradoxus not a paradox?

Welcome to our inaugural Bedside Rounds a new regular feature of Clinical Correlations.  Here you will learn not only practical physical diagnosis pearls, but also the historical context in which these findings were discovered.

Commentary By: Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

When you take a deep breath in, what happens? Because of an increase in the negative intrathoracic pressure, blood is sucked into the right side of the heart. Temporarily, a filled right ventricle can bulge…

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